NerdBrand
NerdBrand

Episode · 1 month ago

Being Real on Social Media with Guest Shane Shaps

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this episode of the NerdBrand podcast, we’ve got Shane Shaps from 520 East Brands and we’re talking about how to keep your brand "real" on social media.

What is a brand voice?

Brand voice is the distinct personality a brand takes on in its communications. Imagine you went to a dinner party and you're chatting with all the guests. One person stands out because they're great at storytelling in a distinctive, unique way.

It is to be noted that this is not the same as brand tone. The tone is informal vs. formal or educational vs. inspiring, for example. Always be as clear as you can, depending on the audience you are trying to engage.

Some facts:

Authenticity on social media can be a game-changer for any brand. According to the 2017 Cohn & Wolfe Authentic Brands Study shows that in 2017 91% of people “are willing to reward a brand for its authenticity via purchase, investment, endorsement or similar action”.

Link to the study:

https://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/309112/amazon-paypal-burt s-bees-top-in-authenticity.html 

Talks center around these topics...

  1. Define“authentic” or “real” and how that may sound or look on social channels
  2. How can you do this on specific platforms, like Twitter?
  3. Why is it important to be clear about what you are using social media for? 
  4. Use REAL imagery, not stock or unclear artwork. Let’s think Canva vs. a professionally created piece by a designer. A professional will consider the channel’s limitations and attention spans and will adhere to brand guidelines.

Yeah, so I got dressed up for you to.Basically, I should put on a shirt with buttons and go shave. Now, I'm good isnot about it. Yeah I thought bout too. I was like yeah, it is a everybody grand podcast. Oh sorry,what we'll start again, what I thought she said: Something: okay,now that's going to be the cold open, a some that's going to that that that'llthat'll work, because that fits like what people probably expect for me.anyways all right here we go welcome to the nerve brand podcast, everybody out,your house Jason. That's John, and this is shame Chans from five twenty eastbrands, and today we're going to be talking about being real and socialmedia and using your voice and branding. But for right now, shame I'm going togive you the floor to kind of tell a people who you are, what you do, whatyou love that kind of thing sure so who I am I'm Shane Shack. I am a nativeLouisvillian who left for a long time came back in two thousand and two andin two thousand and eight I started this business. Basically, because Isaid to my cousin on somebody just pay me to play on facebook and she's goodyeah, so I started this agency, and so we are an outsource voice for thebrands we represent. We work with a lot of companies who either don't have time,don't have the know how or just don't want to deal with it, but they knowthat they have to have a social media presence, but a lot of times. Whatthey'll do is just set up a facebook page and then they post on it for likethree weeks straight they've, all this great stuff and then a year later,they're like Oh, we never did anything and consistency is obviously key. So wewill basically take over their social presence for them and come up with astrategy of persona and deliver on different social media platforms thatmakes sense for their brand their audience and their budget to produceand grow a community. So we're not just...

...about creating fans that, like yourfacebook page, were really about engaging with people and building acommunity for raving fans around your brand, my favorite social mediaplatform. To do that is twitter. I know people think that's crazy, but twitterreally is where you can talk back and forth as a brand to your consumerdirectly, and so I really love that. I feel that facebook has become reallymore of a bill board over the years used to be very back and forth, but ifyou're involved in a facebook group around a brand, that's that's adifferent piece: that's very engaging conversational, so we just really liketo talk to people and we do it online. You ask what I really love. I reallylove my Peleton equipment. I'm kind of a addict everybody ask himmy favorite teacher is, which means they don't follow me on Instagram,because I'm basically stocking Olivia she's, my favorite. I love her and I have a whole communityof people who also love all of her workout. It's fantastic. I have ahusband WHO's working on the other side of the wall. For me, I have two teenagekids, one who is leaving next year for college and two yellow labs who aregoing to behave for the next hour. I like how you just kind o Sittin, thatoutside Lard for those watching on Youtube searchfor us and if you're on Youtube, go look for nerd brand you'll, find thepodcast and find this video you'll watching just kind of look over to thesod like it just basically telling and pointing at the dogs to be well welcome to the show we're gonnahave to have you here, yeah yeah, being out there taking social media. I likehow you describe facebook as a billboard. It does feel that way I about two yearsago. I quit I basically quit using. It...

...actually is more than that. I think Iwas done with it after two thousand and seventeen and then I just kind offocused on linked in more considering a person, and I just wanted to learn oneplatform really well as best I can, and I was not that choice well and I will say Linton. I reallyfeel it does better person to person, there's not a lot of people who want tofollow companies on like den but connecting with people and talking tothem. It is very twitter like if you, if you give it the chance to do sortyeah yeah, I think definitely I mean facebook. FACEBOOK didn't use to bethat way. You know it went and it's not a billboard. If you have money to pay for the engagement and exposure that you usedto get you know for free early days, facebook was you know itwas killing everything. It was a yeah t n. We started this business in twothousand and eight, so we used to be able to talk back and forth to people,but now it's a matter of paying for ads and forcing our content in front ofthose people and then to get them to talk, and you know the society we livein today. It's unlikely they'll, be like I love you. There are more like. Ihate you at her other reasons why I, the worst yeah, so that's kind of the way that facebook isgone. I do feel that it's still important for business, and so we dostill utilize it for basically every business we work on. But you know itreally depends on your business and where your audience, your community,where your people are so like we have one client he's really just oneinstagram. The only reason he has a facebook account is so we can run someads on Instagram, but he's very visual. Everything he's doing is beautifulpictures. Video, so instagram is where he gets engagement, yeah, so to talk a little bit aboutjust kind of evoluted to it a few times in terms of we like to put brands whereit makes sense for them to be- and I know it's a it's a topic- that's beenkind of...

...you know, beat to death for years, butstill a lot of brains still and small businesses feel like they got to beeverywhere. They've got to be on the next new thing they got to be. You knowactively engaging in four or five different platforms, and I mean youknow from experience and I've seen it myself to it shoots them in the footand it's just not practical for most brains right. You know ye an a partnerlike you, probably you know it. You definitely yeah, you don't want tospread yourself too thin. You want to make sure if you're going to investtime, energy and money into Social Dia pick the platforms that number one youthink you can actually perform on that. You can be consistent, that you cancome up with content and that you've got customers on if your people are notso like. For that example, I gave his customers they may be on facebook, butthey're not looking for him on facebook, they're looking to see and we're verysuppeton about what we post. When so he's got the special comes out every Wednesday.His consumers know they go ten am on Wednesday. They look for that oninstagram they're, not looking for Headon facebook, so you need to makesure you're not spreading yourself too thin and that you are setting yourselfup for success and even when we start working with someone on an out source,I mean we also only have a limited number of hours and so well kind ofbuild a program for them. That 'll say. Okay,these are the platforms that make the most sense for your brand. So, let'sstart with these three and then they'll say well what, if we want to add thisfor okay? Well, let's see how we do on these three and let's build a communityhere first, rather than from the getto trying to build for especially Oh mygosh, these new businesses that are coming and they don't have anything onsocial. Yet now they want to build a hill four different platforms at once.That's our lot and or organic! Isn't you know it's really not good a lot ofpots right right exactly so it really.

It really depends on what kind ofbusiness do you have? What kind of demographic do you have? Where are they?You know there are some businesses they go all in on twitter and they're,really nowhere else to be found and that's okay works for them. You know,ticktack is a question. I get a lot. I actually got this question yesterdayfrom a client they're, a local family business. Their clientele is on theolder side of a social media demographic. So we're talking likeforty five to sixty five they, but they sell at a good value but a very expensiveproduct, and so they said, should we be on tick, Tock and like well, there's aplace for it and there's definitely some fun we could have, but I reallyfeel that your next audience, your next buyer, is on Tick Tock. So let's kindof keep it on the radar and watch for it and let's see what we do with it insix months to a year. I don't think we need to start it today, especially whenwe're on how's Pentre, facebook, twitter and instagram and Linkedin, soso that those are the kinds of conversations be held with clients. Yes,I think it plays in coming takes an if you want to kind of loop it into theshow it's like. Well, then, how do you choose those platforms and it reallycomes down to like you said a lot of it is audience demographics, so you tryingto reach, but it's also, what is your brains just general? What's your voice,what kind of tone can you reasonably take? I mean some brands really justwouldn't fit in and twitter. They just can't do that kind of short banter orshort information type stuff. So I think I mean it plays into if we, ifwe're kind of talking about how do you choose those platforms that are bestfor you, you've got a really truly heavy firm grasp of what is yourauthentic, your voice as a brand? What do you,what are you trying to convey to people and that voice attracts that audience?So, if you're before you engage probably even in social, you obviouslyhave a voice of your brand and so the brand voice. Is it's just it's justyour justing personality n of your...

...brand to all the communications thatkind of come out from your brand that the that is it like. You can hear likewith nerd brand, there's our voice, not my Monilon, talking about like what Isound like, because I know on recording. I sound like one of those high pitchedAd Mens M, one thousand nine hundred and fifty commercials like that sparkplugs at radio spark plugs or not any that I know I have that kind of voice,but because we all want to sound like this. We want to sound really deep andyou know there was this old joke like. Wouldn't it be funny sound, deep yeahit wouldn't it be funny if we got to Heaven- and we expect God to have thisbooming voice and we get up there and he sounds like Mickey Mouse. That'sjust going to be hilarious, if that's the case, but you know we'll see anyhow,my point is is that one person stands out because they're a greatstorytelling like there's, there's people that we have seen speak publiclythat have been absolutely engaging and then there's others that we fall asleep.Well, that's their brand. You know from their voice. I I how they communicate.That's why people are drawn to them because they enjoy listening andhearing and reading what they produce. Even if somebody else was to do thesame thing but be like monotone with it probably wouldn't be as effective. That's not the same as tone tone. Youcan have several tones in your brand, so in social one channel could beplayful. Another channel could be formal so on leaked and you could bevery formal, but on these other channels you could be playful and forus this podcast. This is where we get to play. You know if you try and lookat us in other channels, the business channels, not necessarily mine, thenyou'll see more formal type, stuff kind of going out right right and we'rewoking o the client right now, where they're very serious they're in higherhead, so very professional faculty type professors, but they're also hiring,and they have a very tun office inside so where we are making some decisionsis linkedin and facebook is very much for that outward audience, but fortheir hiring kinds of content, we're...

...using instagram and we're showing offtheir people and how much fun they have, and you know, they're closed for acompany Wide Mental Health Day. Hey that's great stuff, you know notsomething we're necessarily going to put on face buck, but it's going towork on Instagram for recruiting yeah and recruiting, of course, is abig challenge. Right now I mean there's A. I know like the pharmacy up the roadfor me close because they can't they don't have a Parmacetty, can't hire orfind anybody in the BB. In my city, where I live in new Albany, they closedit because they just don't have any workers, so the the employee short juststarting to show up, but so those jobs exist and far as I know, they paypretty good. But why not able to fill those roles? And you know we don't know,I'm not making any assumptions about any of these. Can a judgment yeah? Whatbrand that your brand is an internal and external thing. So you know youhave to start looking at to when you start attracting an audience. It'sgoing to be for several factors. You know your C Company's culture. Whatpeople are saying and doing it work for you are working in the organization.Other people see that and have their own social channels as well. We've donea podcast before we're John Steven santel about, like you know, shouldemployees have social media channels and should they be putting stuff out,and so, if you want to listen to that and go back and listen to that thosethoughts and advice on that. But it's like you know, people still see thatand that can reflect you know a brand and what's happening turn to make adecision or whether or not. If I want to work there or if I want to be a partof that culture right yeah. I think that I mean it's.The hiring issue is a hundred percent of branding problem. That's kind of mymy philosophy. I mean it's the same thing. It's exactly the same as tryingto attract customers. We got to tell your employees stories. You got to givepeople a reason. You know they got to be able to latch onto something andfeel good getting out of bed and coming to work or whatever, but you can't testhave customer testimony is you've got to have employed testimonials as well,and I will just give a pitch for all...

...those people who love to write reviewsonline, who get angry there waiting on a long line or their order is on Niceto the people that showed up to work come on man yeah. It's really. It'sreally unfair. I mean, regardless of what somebody is paid on the hour, whattheir salary is. The job is chosen, or is there out of necessity or desire?You know for passion, but when some people come in and you're treated, ervery badly outer internally or externally they're not going to stay atthat job, all right so be you know if you really want. You know good service,be mindful of WHO's, providing US orskin and remember: There's a socialmedia person who has to respond to your negative yelp for you, they've got itand they've got to be. They've got a walk just on egg shells, all the time,a very stressful job, to do that when got into that job, because it's socialmedia and it was desire, it was created out of fun and positivity, like ethere's, a lot of things that have happened over the week that, as of thisrecording, happened with facebook and continue to unfold that to the news organizations to runthose stories. But I think everybody that was listening knows exactly whatI'm talking about, and you know toxicity is not good, nomatter where it's at or where it's coming from or who it is it's just nothealthy. So right and my friend, my friend Jack Rustan,has always said you social media to put some good ouge o the world. So if youfeel like you need to go online and write a review and you're angry at somebusiness pick up business, you love and write a positive review about them.Instead and just let the negative watch, em yeah other minute, maybe I'll, feelbetter. Tomorrow Take Grandma's at life. You got not nice to say, don't saynothing at all. Exactly but authenticity on social me to can be agame changer for any brand according to a two thousand and seventeen. I guessthis is pronounced. Conan, Wolf, authentic brand study shows that in twothousand and seventeen ninety one percent of people are willing to rewarda brand for its authenticity VI, a...

...purchase, investment endorsement orsimilar action, so that kind of dove tells into what we're talking about benice, because you know all the brands that are online. They exist, for youknow a purpose of doing business. There is a financial gain for it, we'll put alink into that study and our youtube description below, so that you can cookon that and read that if you all like out there and the youtube verse, but Ikind of want to see what you gol think, what defineth NTIC or real to you andwhat it sounds like, maybe on social media or if you've seen it. What whatwas the where some examples? Well, I think it's important to be ahuman remember that even if you're an all use twitter is my example, even ifyou're tweeting, as some company still a person, you know and people will saywell well, we're a be to bear were a be to see you're a person, a person. Youare one person talking to other people, and so when I'm on twitter, whether Iam being myself or I'm being a human who I'm representing or a brand, I justtry to be real and you know I never happy in pace and do the same thingfrom client client, because that's not what I do, but I sometimes they'll be arunning theme and you'll see it on different switter accounts. I handle iteven though it's said in a different way, just depending on what's going onin the world that day, you know, maybe it's a hurricane and this clientstalking about this plan and I'm talking about it and so we're all kind oftaking that stance, but you just want to be authentic as a human. Justremember- and you know I just spoke about this last week at Sem world- andI talked about the visuals- stop trying to make your pictures so perfect. NotEverything you put out on twitter or in a story has to be like this high red,beautiful product, phototype filter, those through you are trying to sellyour product, but take some selfies, and if it's not the most perfectpictures, that's okay! It's real! It's...

...in the moment. You know I mean I saidto you. I got up and actually put on hair and makeup today, which I don'tnormally do on Fridays, so you know, but I really could have just shown upin my glasses and my Scott Jam, my pajamas and Ben Real, but I don't feellike doing that s so, but I think it's okay, it's so kay to be real and tohave a real voice, have no converse with people on de one and, mostimportantly, listen- stop pushing your stuff out there by my product. Listento me use this coupon visit. My website felt that should be a very little bitof what you're doing on social. Really it should be much more conversationaland just person a person yeah we not about what we do with this podcast andhaving the guest on that. We have they're in our industry and advertisingin some way, but they're all saying in some way. If you go back and reviewthey're all saying the same thing and it's not us, it's not nerve brand nervebrandish is providing an outlet for that. Even though we have ourselvessaid this as well, when we don't have a guest on the show, but at the end ofthe day it's like you know, this is not a it's, not a sales pitch. It's just.This is how people engage with media, and you know being authentic to me is like yeah.It's like you said you just don't don't try to put on a facade. I mean it justlooks er, it doesn't look, doesn't look real, doesn't look like I want to do it.I was talking to somebody before about like this podcast, like we have here onzoom yeah, it's not over produced and when we move to the studio yeah, thequality will go up because we're in a studio and there's extra hands. Now youknow touching the show moving forward, but it's so much so much more of adifference than that than that I mean it's still the same people I still showup in a superhero shirt unshaven, but expect nothing less day. Yes andeverybody will be like. Oh it's that guy he's just at a table with adifferent microphone that doesn't look like loose Scott Walkers training toolthat I...

...got that yeah. I like a lot of it goesback. I think a lot of it goes back to the to the last part of what you said.Shame it's. You know for me being authentic and it's alwaysbeen a struggle with social media. Is How do you get? How do you get yourstory across without being too pushy without using it as a broadcastingmechanism? and to me, you know from an executional standpoint, I think one ofthe easiest things or simplest things to do is to engageyour customers and get them to tell your story, and everybody says that,but it really is kind of the secret. Stop internalizing this desire to beauthentic. Your what's authentic is that your customer is your clients,whoever they may be had a positive experience. They had apositive change in their life, something you did solve their problem.Let them tell that star. There is nothing like the I in that, and I thinkthat's you know, even for a local small business, I mean those stories existbecause I know the next question is like. How do I activate that? How do Iget people to share these things with me? I think so. If Eve, then you think I mean it sounds dumb, but just ask youknow you have to create the mechanism togive people an opportunity, whether that's you know some kind ofpromotional landing page. I mean you got to run kind of a campaign around itto incentivize and engage those people you want to respond. It's just the sameas any other kind of advertising a approach, but you know I see so fewbusinesses just ask. They wait for those reviews to show up from Google oryou know ye whatever, and then maybe they do check it on that, but so soinfrequently they actually see a positive review and there, like you,give themselves a pet on the back and then they don't do anything with itright yeah. So we try to repurpose those for our client. So one of thethings I an sure you've had this experience. Where somebody comes to dosomething work on your house write a plumber or the the bug spray guy. Ialways get this tex right when he...

...leaves I get a text thanks for the forusing our service. Will you fill out a review and there's a like that click?Yeah? You Bet, I'm I'm very happy. I don't see any more bugs I'm happy to togive you that review. So then, on our end, when those kinds of reviews comein for our clients, well then we'll take that will copy pace, make a quickgraphic out of it, throw it out unsocial, look at how happy this clientis and then, if it's a really great review, we'll have the client reach outto that customer and say: Can we film you on video when you get on zoom withour social media person and let her record this and then we re purposedthat review again for a third time. So now it's out on the web, it's gotograph, it's got a video, so you know. Maybe it was such a great experiencethat it even becomes a blog post. So there's a lot of ways that you can takethis one little instance and create some real content with really not a tonof thought and, if you're afraid of making graphics, we are not graphicdesigners, but we use Canda and it s. You know, there's a free version. It'sreally simple: We don't have the free version, but we started with the freeversion until they sort of like got a little bit better with this and neededmore puns. But I you know, I think that any small business on Er really caninvest in that you don't need to go out to a graphic designer, although if you,if you want to do that and outsource it, certainly I can refer a few of US yeah. That's one of the questions Ihave. I like real imagery nut stock and unclear art, so I did make the prefectyou know professional versus canvas argument, because I mean on CAMPA. Itis quick because I mean social media is something it's very quick. You can putit out there, John Sus Panda before, but typically you know, I mean Mitchesin in design and illustrator he's not, and you know, but you know, to sit and create all thatyou have to have. The strategy has to be time right. If it's so it's veryfast and has a quick turn around then. Yes, I can see the justificationabsolutely for canvas, but still...

...everybody has a different eye fordesign. Everybody has a different eye for quality. Our job is to make surethat that eye is still on brand, that it is still it's not just a matter of the correctcolors, the correct logo, it's more than that. It's what it's! What it's?What it's trying to convey if your target audience is an older demographic,don't go grab stock, imagery that has a bunch of young people standing andlooking over a take it exactly. I love this, but we also you know we will tryto not use stock in misery as much as possible where we'll get authenticimages from the client and then lay it out in Campa yeah, there's nothing. Ihate worse than seeing stock imagery. You know, post, post, post and they'reall different accounts same people. That's just not gin. For me, you know,and sometimes it's a necessary evil, sometimes that the client just doesn'thave the content or we have a client right now. We're working on somegraphics for that need to go on an instagram and he's got the pictures,but he doesn't have permission yet so in the interest of time for using somestock votes. Until he gets that permission, then we can move on withthe Google drive, and so that's a really good point to bring up likeimagery aside from getting into too deep ness, because I've been in thisfor a while, but it's like imagery is really getting cracked on as far aspermissions and things like that, there's like three different kind oflicense types and paying attention to that is very important, no matter whatplatform you're publishing on, because you do not want to get that dreadedseason desist letter and that's just all there is to it. I mean we John andI well both in the past work for places that have gotten that, and sometimesthey don't get a warning. They just say: here's the fun. So you know you have tobe very cautious about what the materials are. What you're using andthat's sort of where you know you have to pay attention to your message. More,you have to pay attention to where the images are coming from and if you canafford a budget for custom photography, a brand image person. We have one onstaff. Her name is coral and she's brand imagery expert and she does brandconsulting. I mean her job is to help...

...you walk through that process, because it's invaluable because lateron, when it gets down to you Shane, it's going to be like where what am Iusing and coral and John will be like this. Have One client where they've got aninternal graphic designer and so we'll sort of lay out. You know this iscoming up next week. Here's the kind of content I'm sharing and I need somegraphics to go with these pieces and she's like well. What do you want toput it on? I like I'm, not the artist, I don't know you do it here. It has tosay this and then she's like well what color blue, I don't know you. You know we all have our own specialchies and I think that that's another piece, that's really important is that you know. Sometimes people will hire usand be like well. Can you also make all of these graphics, and can you alsowrite a press release, and can you also there's a lot of? Can you also andwe've talked about this in the chamber or how we got to know each other? Thereare our industry has grown so much and it isn't siloed, but it is segmented.You know each of us handle such a different piece of the marketing puzzleand all of them are important and it's we one of our favorite things is tocome on to a client who has a team already they've got a PR person.They've got an Seo web developer. They've got a brand creator. You know,they've got an overall marketing person. Those are our favorite kinds of clientsto work on because we stay in our lane. We're working on creating conversation,making sure that what we're putting out there is authentic making sure we'vegot good listening tools set up, but as far as all the other pieces were reallyrelying on the specialist for that- and I think sometimes businesses,especially small businesses, don't yet get that that each of thesepieces are important and each of them take a budget yeah. They also figurethat, because I hired a marketing director, I now have a markingdepartment and I have all those pieces now and it's like I've been to acurrent. Like a you know: Orchestra,...

...like Type Concert before I've, neverseen like the director get up at the one and just wave it around in front ofthe bunch. If y cares, that's a great analogy, yeah then all of a sudden, I'mlike! Oh you know what I've ever heard: batoons fifth plate like that. Well,what did it sound like like that? You know, and it's sort oflike what happens with your marketing strategy. You know you hire this personand they're like I know my they have enough time in the week. They have tohave time to think whether they In't shower washing their hair at home orwhether they're in the office. It doesn't matter a gay have time to thinkabout what it is you're going to do right. Sometimes you know what theproblem is, and you can just tackle that one problem, but then the otherthings that is the expectation of the employers, is that what about thewebsite and updating it and updating that and you're just like, but can Iget it one thing at a time I'm only a one person show and it sometimes missed.I think that, and a lot of that I think, has to do with how we've explainedmarketing has or Shane you, and I and the chamberhave gotten direct questions like how does this all fit together? We don'treally understand, what's first WHO's on first WHO's on third, whatever youknow, and it's like well, you know- and I've made the argument before, becausewhen I go to these groups, I mean literally I've been finding that youknow sitting there as a branding agency. They look at me for the marketing andI'm like HMM, no right and then they're like well. Can you do pr well yeah, butthere's Kim we use our still act out on project andit's no. You know. No, I mean we have I'm trying that Iand I'm hoping that the example is there, because it's easier to learn byseeing that it is reading- and you know some of the people that we know I hopethey can see through the activity like. Oh that's, what nerd brand does youguys are like in the business like right next to the business folks likeIno the business strate Jin that point before how we can't really separateourselves from the business strategy?...

But service providers can, but we haveto be in the chair that way, everybody's on task on brand on messageand right, that's hard to pitch and explain and show what itlooks like because it's a complete intangible. But when you get thosenegative reviews, now it's tangible right yeah and what we do. You know asa social media engagement agency. We come way after what you do and thenyou're still involved, but your work starts. I mean it could be a yearbefore we're brought into a business, at least in a perfect world. You knowwhere you're developing all of these personas and messages and branding andeverything that goes together. We come in and implement, but making those bigdecisions. I don't want that responsibility you to take that shame. Well, thank you for being on theshow we've had, I hope, like I hope everybody out therewas able to take something away from this. If you're listening you're, likeyou know what I really need to next year up my game on social media, we'dlove to talk with you, you actually now know who one of our preferred vendorsare to help us out and help you out is now, so we would love to have thatconversation John, you got anything you want to pluganything for just finally close, not us, but definitely a shame if you want tokind of tell people where they can find you your website and obviously onsocial sure. So you can find me at five: Twenty East brandom people want to knowwhere that name came from. I used to live in New York City at five D D, Ten,seventy second street to side twenty e and yeah. That's what it is by twentyPrenom is where you can find us. You can find me on twitter at five twenty sbrand. I will always treat you back and Mondays at noon. You can find me liveon facebook, Lington and Youtube for my left. Get real show and Jason was arecent guest. So if you missed it, you...

...can catch up on Youtube. there. You Go,there's all the deeds peoples so as you're here on Youtube. Listening to usmake sure you like him, subscribe, hitting the bell get the latest videos.We want to thank our recent subscribers. We've had two or three of you, thanksto you for thanks to you, you can tell it's Friday and I'm hungry, becausethis is where I start to break down. This is like a thing in the show. Iswear to go guys anybody out there listening to this. It is, then, a MickJason really is this goofy anyway do have an almondy. I know I don't like coconut either so anywaysyou can find us at ner brand agency everywhere on social media. You canalso find us at ner brand agency COM podcast to listen to this latestepisode or watch the video of it. We want to thank all of our listeners andsubscribers once again. Thank you. Shame for being on the show and toeverybody out there remember, keeping nerd brand strong a.

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Episodes (84)