NerdBrand
NerdBrand

Episode · 1 week ago

Mastering Authentic Marketing

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this episode of the NerdBrand podcast we talk about avoiding your consumer's BS meter.

Authentic marketing actually requires you, the marketer, to be a fan of the services or product you are marketing. Without that connection, marketing efforts can be inauthentic in which the audience could pick up on, and ignore the brand entirely.

Branding sets the stage for creating that connection for the marketers because of how the brand looks, sounds, and feels to them. Therefore inspiring creative and effective marketing campaigns.

Also, as a bonus we discuss “fast-vertising” (a term Reynolds coined), which involves treating real-time cultural moments as a springboard, to build their own brand buzz. Rapid deployment of your ads is related to this method, which can create authentic moments, but be careful as not everything is humorous, or timely. Essentially READ THE ROOM.

For example: The Peloton ad (in response to the Me Too movement) was 72 hours from conception to production complete for distribution.

Mitch is checking his phone. I you knowright at the beginning of the P yeah. You know, I'm sorry it started buzzing. I know I never I elmo number one o yourfired. I never again o ther an podcast ere body, a motation.This is mich and that's John and today we're talking about mastering authenticmarketing. So basically it's trying to kind of ties into what I just said itdoesn't. It avoids the BS meter as I've written here on the note, because yourconsumers, they can smell that so don't do it. Authentic marketing actuallyrequires you, the market or be a fan of the service of product you're marketing.Without that connection, marketing efforts can be inauthentic in which theaudience could pick up and ignore the brand identity entirely. So what do you guys think? That's! Thewhole episode ever go all right, well, good, thanks and come back next time,an Andrews job, easy I mean. I mean I've said this over andover and over again, like many things, it's people have so many ways now tofind out how authentic or how real you are. They can go to. They can googleyou they can look at you on social media and, if they're not getting a if they're, not getting the same vibefrom all those sources versus the interaction they may actually have withyour brand in a transaction they're going to find out very quickly or ifwhat you're saying about your brand and your marketing they're going to knowpretty fast. These days, people find out things instantaneously, Google,social media. Whatever the case yeah, I mean you're trying to attract trustfrom an audience. I mean that's really what you're trying to do you re tryingto build trust or as a Ripe Por, I don't know how to say it right, repell.You know I'll tell you guys this report. If one of you were taken hostage andthey were like- if you don't spell this word correctly- your friend is going todie, and if that word is restaurant, it's been really nice. Knowing you toyeah, because I would be like res Tr on today, I don't were exactly we'reexactly does or on yeah. Where exactly does the a? U Fall in the spell, Ialways is it here. Is it here? It's the left sin for sure I left side oyit mean forauthenticity because everybody says it. You know this has been the thing beauthentic yeah. It's been the marketing thing, for I don't know, probably for ever in some form offashion, but that phrase in itself. Since I I feel like it's about six orseven years when social came about people were like well, you got toreally be authentic coin. So so you got to be real right. What does that mean?Well, an es don't wake up in the morning and then you know try topresent yourself like. This is how I look when I wake up in the morning. Youknow, because it that's sort of becoming like a movie trop with certainfilms that deal with you know, situational dramas orwhatever it's like yeah. Everybody like on Instagram is not really how theylook. No Yeah. I know Shocker, I'm stunned, yeah, you know yeah, but it'sin. I think probably this this whole. I mean I you well, you know now I mean, I think, that's probably theadvent of all this it started. The drum beat really started with social media,because that was the door to showing your authentic you well. It also becamethe door to being in authentic, exactly he's set up this separate life orwhatever, as a brain, you set up this sort of you try to set up this separateidentity. In a sense you try to be what you think the public wants to seeperception, but you have to actually do that, and people can pick up on itpretty easily yeah I mean we have met.

All three of us have met and workedwith, or for people that we've seen that are not authentic and sometimes insenses, and ways that are just incredibly demonstrative is. Is that a work? Asfor that? If you want to, I mean a poor, I'm the senior member here, so I've gota longer history to deal with, but I can tell you that's just the nature,unfortunately, in the advertising and Marketing Universe, you're going to geta lot of that yeah. Well, I mean that's because the whole point of advertisingmarketing is to project an image right anyway. So so all on sell you on whyyou should do yeah. So obviously, but sometimes I just think that you knowyou have to be careful like with your brand anyways, because, like we'vetalked about on the last show with Mary Reed was you know, the people in yourcompany are going to talk about the brand e're going to talk about thebusiness they're going to be bought into the mission and everything and Soo.When that happens, it's very organic to talk about it, discuss it and thosepersonalities like there's no in authenticness whatever to it right,because you actually are bought it and believe it like they're not going totry to conform- and you know like Oh yeah, I'm totally bought into thisthing and in the back of their mind, they're, like God, I'd just rather besome place else, oh well, I mean I mean how many of us I mean. Who've workedfor like a larger corporation and part of your orientation, whether it's, whether it said you know, literally or otherwise, there's alwaysthat kind of in they're trying to get you to buy into the brand at thebeginning. Because- and we preach this John- you we've talked about this being an authentic brand startsinternally. You have to actually believe and live and perform the win. Your brand says it does andyou have to have that same attitude internally. Otherwise, when you try toproject it or projecting something that isn't real and people again Ataneaearlier there's ways they can pick up very quickly on whether or not that'sthe case yeah. So let's talk about the the one person. That's in the shownotes the kind of like we've seen. Do this really well and actual coin, aphrase called fast, vertigine, okay m many many have latched on tothis and they've started, defining it and I'm just like wait a minute. Okay,Look Ryan Reynolds actually came up with this. So well you hey everybody,let's cut and ask Ryan Reynolds what he has to say and then at that point, inthis podcast you're, probably going to like Oh cool, you got run rentals onthe show. Now we don't sorry, my right close enough yeah was enough. anyways.It involves treating real time. Cultural moments is a spring board tobuild their own brand buzz. Rapid deployment of your ads is related tothis method, which can create authentic moments, but be careful because noteverything is humorous or timely, essentially read the room right, you know your and which goes to knowyour audience. It's related, no, it not in knowing your audience,isn't just about knowing what they like and what they're about, but where theyare in that moment in time, what's happening around them yeah, because Ihope Peleton thing, they turned that around really quick and if they haddone that, like six months after that had happened, I nobody would have madethe connection, and you know a big part of push that along was the industry.Folks were like Holy Crap. How did you do that so quickly right and it wasspot on you know. How did you get that creative that quickly produce you knowand distribute? That's the other half I found I found an interview that he didand he said that it was in the it was in the Broun seventy two hours fromconcept to production, to complete to distribution seven to two hours. Whenyou have a good idea, you know yeah en yo got on it when you have theresources to get the wheels in motion. You know what I mean yeah when you canpick up the phone and start calling people saying. Okay, we have to do this.Now I mean you have to have resources,...

...both human and otherwise, at the ready to be able to pullsomething like that off and not everybody can do that. Well, just thinkabout how long it takes us to get a bar to do a photo, shoot or video shoot.You know they. You know he could call anybody and be like Hey, I'm Ryan,Reynolds and I'd like to shoot a commercial in right in your Hor. OhYeah. Anybody would drop for that they be like yeah come on in like well.Isn't it prime time when you get it doesn't matter, is Ryan Reynolds, butyeah there's a little bit of that that that said, what do you guys think about the factthat is kind of in the term around digital, this digital universe? We livein and having pretty ready access to resources to produce content? Hasn't that made it easier for peopleto turn on a dime in a way that maybe they couldn't in the past and getcreate something and get it out quickly, because you've got digital camerasbecause you've got computers because you've got ipads and iphones et Cetera.You can. You can literally turn around and produce content in a matter ofhours rather than as a weeks by yourself right, yeah well see. Thething is, with this whole, with the Peleton Ryan Reynolds, he had mean hisbranding agency live not is built around his him. You know, I mean acreative director yeah, I mean he's a creative director of it. For those thatdon't know- and you know it literally- one of the mission statements is thatthis brand agency serves right. Reynolds is wilms and I mean that'skind of the tone is good instincts, so yeah, that's the tone of the brand. Hes. He that's it. So when you know the tone, when you know yourself, you canturn around things very quickly because everybody kind of understands thedirection we're going in because you know Ryan Reynolds doesn't sound likeyou know, Johnny Carson or whatever you know it'slike. I know I really went way back there didn't. No. I know who that isyeah. I wasn't. I don't know when he left the tonight show, but I doremember when Jalena got it, but I think on the yeah I was in high school.I was born in one thousand nine hundred and ninety I think al. I was a huge fansince I was a little boy, yeah anyways, I digress, you're, not that person, soit's pretty easy to kind of like spit out something in seventy two hours. Butwhat you were saying, John, and still you got to get the location. Well, yeahI mean it's all all the logistics and then actually filming something that's worthy. Youknow your idea may not come to life as you planned and then again,distribution getting it out there getting it to you to button some moneybehind it. Maybe I don't know how they did it, but starting to generate thatbuzz, which it helps if you're right Rotolo got a twitter, fol yeah knowlike there are some built ins, yeah yeah. You can't really distributecontent. If you don't have that many followers or is not many peoplelistening or paying attention, we you you better, say something pretty catchy to get you that whole term or not toget that organ to Git that organic reach. He worked for it. You know, ifyou think about it, it just takes time. I mean he was when he was eighteen ornineteen and he was working like the graveyard shift at a grocery storestocking shelves. So like he came from that to what he is now yeah yeah, Imean if he was still the Ryan Reynolds back in the day when he did the moviecalled waiting which, if any of you have never seen that, oh my God that'llgive you an eye opener about that universe. Don't watch that? It's not kid friendly!Don't watch that, but he was a you know, but if he was still that stage in his career as an actor that no,of course not. You know, I mean he has evolved in his career and is a personlike tremendously yeah. But if you think about it, you've watched ifyou've seen waiting he's still essentially yeah. He still has thatpersonnalite has sharp, has bamer yeah, but you know, even though he's probablynot wanting to be fond of the memories of it, but in Green Landord is when hemet his wife. You know at least I guess something good came of it. That was theonly thing I think that he would probably say that did, but you know he's he's kind of grownnow, he's retired from acting at least.

It seems that way. I think he's bettersabatical he's not having to jump on every offer that comes across the table.He's got that luxury he's I mean, there's another actor, that's also in aworks in the advertising realm. It serves as a creative director who kindof is, isn't that same yeah, completely different personality and the same inthat same occupies that same space, and that is Matthew. Maconahay M, I meanhe's the creative director for right all right, all right, don't do it just.I know you hesitate what he thought about it. I did body was going checkedout it. You checked our you know made a contact, not okay, but you didn't wave me off. So I waslike I'm doing it. I knew something was got. I didn't know what was coming, butsomething was coming out anyway. I was curious. He was the creative directorfor Wild Turkey UH. That sounds right, that for a campaign- and I don't knowif he's the create rector up- he's the most visible face for Cadillac now, but yeah he's another of those guys whohas a as probably I'm not sure his instincts may be or is good is Ryan Reynolds. Well, I think thathe's not bad that Ho ever met the guys yeah, I m, but if you watch the, if youlook at their body of work and I'm talking on them, the advertising typestuff for one thing, Renans is just prolific. I mean there's a wirelesscompany out of Canada. He does work for there's some kind of low carb cookie or something he's done work forus you on Facebook, I mean he has a pretty broad repertoire, yeah, yeah and he's beinghimself I mean he's being I mean that's the whole thing about Autentici Y. Imean you, don't you could literally watch the movie dead pool or the series-and I don't know if there's a third one coming or not, but I mean you couldwatch it and then you watch like what he does in that world and you're. Likeyeah yeah, that's that's the same guy work, quirky funny very quick witted, which is interesting. I mean kind of isa side now, if you, if you've seen any of the handful of more serious roles,he's done, he can do it. I mean he does seriousstuff. Well, yeah yeah, but the are so he sins got. The same tone Ah, issimilar TS yeah, that's kind of the point. It's a brand yeah yeah and youremember the ads. I mean I still remember the ads that he's done. AnHe's been putting his name and his agency behind, and I remember them Imean so there's that authenticity also creates that memorable. You know that Idon't know what the word is. I'm just going to stop because I was just streetup like four of them in this podcast. It's interesting because you look at MCCONAHA and you look at Ryan Reynolds. Not that will make the whole podcastbut those two, because I'm sure there's others what we have. So it's okay, yeahyeah. I mean we're talking about authentic marketing. So these are thetwo that kind of there's pretty many people listening Aron. Really theydon't know that. That's what these guys do they don't they just see them astheir roles in the movies and think, like, Oh yeah, that's the guy that youknow made a now. Does the it all right all right and that's the other guy thatwas dead, pull that's, who he did it again, yeah? That might be the limpyeah, but I didn't try to imitate I'm leaving anyway. They probably justdon't you never know. They may not know that. Oh I didn't know they werecreative directors of you know these. These bans, like I, when you mentionedthe Cadillac thing my mind, did immediately go to not the commercialsthat he did, but it went to the gym. Carry SNL where he's like pretending toroll a bigger they made fun of that like that was outlike when those commercials came out. Jim Carey was on SNL and that came outlike obviously Saturday night. I don't remember I do I was hilarious. It wasas he was, impersonating Matthew, MC connaughy in the commercials driving,and I was mentioning like how you's rolling her. I didn't see that far, butI saw some real some of the other impersonations it I mean the reason Imean. I think the reason why wild Turkey went to mcconnachie. That reasonis, I think, there's an authentic authenticity about those about them asactors that comes through in the roles that it's consistent and the same thing with Ron Reynolds.But again I go back. It's just really interesting Ryan Rolls is reallyplanted a flag in the marketing and advertising side of things is somethinghe really has a has a heart for and...

...mcconkie of, like. I think I'll do this,because it sounds fun and it's I mean it's authentic and the work is prettygood, but you can tell that run rolls. Is it it'sin his blood? He really enjoys it he's not just in because he wants is lookingfor another revenue stream, I'm sure. If that helps yeah I an ill neget yeah.I got an energy yeah, which I mean a good marketer. Good advertiser has acertain energy about them. Typically well he's an entrepreneur and that toyou know I mean aviation gin. I mean he sold that for what one hundred seventymillion something I didn't it yeah he did. He still. He still does so. Thosepromotional work for it yeah yeah. So you know I mean as far as his I thinkhe kind of lashed on the days like wait a minute. If I want to play in thesedifferent areas and I'll just be a branding agency, a wild just do thatand then I get to play there and the other cool thing that they do is to Imean they do like. If you look at their website and what they do, I meanthey're they're in a market that I would love to be in it, but they'reediting, movie, trailers and they're involved with studios and promotion ofthose movies. I would love to do that because I have a heart, for I lovemovies. Obviously so you know, I'd love to you know, do some movie trailers andstuff like that, and that be fun in a world where Jason is performed,producing movie trailers, I'm leaving again, I think you're jealous, becausewe've got some link, impersonation shops and we haven't heard I'm waitingfor my opportunity. You waiting for your opportunity. Okay, yeah, I'm justkind of curious what you got in in the line to I'm trying to you know it's oneday, not something you plan yeah, it's going to explode her, I'm going to gowhat yeah all of a sudden we're gonna be sitting here. Talking and all of asudden we got Peter Griffin on the show are just like wait hold on. That'sprobably not wouldbe awesome. That's probably not I well. If it's spongebob, I'm leavingthe show that, I would say, that's probably even less like Godfray bePatrick, I'm G, I'm getting a starfish Bot, a a all right, coolly around and yeah. It is interesting. I go back on track. It is interesting.I'm trying to steer s back, we've kind of moved off the south road. It isinteresting. I mean again going back to the decades and decades and decades ofexperiences in this business. There is a performance you makeyourself sound, so ancient, because sometimes I feel it there's a performance angle in thisbusiness, even if you're not in in front of the camera, the being kind of behind it, whetherit's producing video advertising print digit. Whatever the case there is aperformance vive to it, you are you're, creating an your crafting and I'm surethat's probably another reason why these people like Reynolds andmcconnachie another it's another way to perform yeah it's another way toexercise those skills in that desire, but in a different now anybody Thainthat fastor means like spur of the moment and unplanned not strategic,just pick up the phone and turn the camera and start hitting record and cantell the person on he other side do a thing: Yeah, that's haphazard, yeah! No,that's not what that's not what they do, obviously, that seventy two hours andeverything they like they. Obviously that was something that I think therewas some interviews at while back when the first deadpool movie came out andhe was doing like you know what Robert Denny Junior would call selling soapand you know, do the talk, show circuit interviews and all that Roan rillsdoing the same thing and he was talking to them. He's like he was texting themarketing guys billboard ideas and they just started talking Emoji for Deadpool,and it was just the skull, the poop and the L, and that was the entire billboard and he said he, the Marnin guys were like we're going to do that, andhe said you don't have the guts and then sure enough. They did you know,and it's like. I think that that's how how that works. He has that team on theback supporting himand they're like...

...yeah, there's that just energy as theysay you know- and I think that that's why, but that's still not haphazard,that's still staying in line with the personality that they're trying to youknow project to put out there. You know it's just the way it is. I M N and itgoes back to authenticity again and that was b. That was a real moment thatsomebody had that had a real, unique, strong, creative idea and the abilityto take advantage of it quickly and there's just there's someindustries. I think some products, some services were that's easier to dobecause, because the the Gothe, the out ofbounds lines, are so wide you've got so much room to play. Yeah it's harder. I think if you have aproduct, that's more narrow that maybe maybe- and maybe I'm wrong. As I'msaying this, I'm wonder I'm saying guessing myself, but still if it's aproduct server that has a very narrow focus. Maybe it's harder! I don't say Iit's Chargin, probably harted it it's harder to think that open! You knowwhat I mean to have that big of a playground to plan. Well, I meanthere's, there's budget considerations. There's you know, timing and till thatthere's so much luck involved with it too. I mean you can have the greatestidea in the world, but if you don't distribute it at the right time, if youdistribute it the right way, if you don't distribute it at the right timelike if something major had happened, the day that he released, that ontwitter, because waters really were that that whole conversation around thethe Peleton and that turn around you know generated conversation and then ithit the press and all that stuff. But if something major had taken theheadlines that day your great idea, you know it's adifferent story: IT'S GOING YEAH! Well, it's happened. It buried. It happenedin ner culture years ago. I remember when DC comics killed super band. Therewas literally nothing going on in the news that day and that had hiteverywhere, because they were like who's going to war with so and nonobody, everybody seems to be fine today and then all of a sudden somebodycame in and said I just read a dease come that killed superman like what atand then they ran with that, and that literally became a thing, and you knowso yeah like what you said a lot of it has timing and luck, and there is thoseelements that sometimes, when you do something that you know you have tothere'sh it's important for for other brains. Who aren't you know of this?This stature like just because one idea didn't work out. It doesn't mean thatthe channels broken it doesn't mean that you're, you know your team isbroken. You know, there's all kinds of variables that you kind of just have tokeep iterating and again, there's always a hint of luck inany advertising. Yeah, it's going to actually catch on with the audiencethat you in didn't for it to catch on or a different audience yeah, becausenew slash they killed batman to. But nobody heard about that. Not it didn't i just heard about it: itdidn't they didn't, kill him. He was severely wounded. Well now, they'vekilled him twice. I see first time it was dark, sit, killed him and then thesecond time the joker did in a cave of the scott snider his run, that's when they started defining thejob. I don't know why we're talking about this on the well i get showed upas i did show. I i've never been a huge batman, yeah, i'm the dc guy he's themarvel guy and that's why, like he will he'll school me on, like you know,annals and all that stuff. I ain't got a clue about like whose squirrel girlis or anything. I know, i'm not touching it. I'm not touchingthat pleasing it alone, but i mean it's interesting. I mean inorder to this this kind of crosses into the whole. You know rap what you would call like. Rapidresponse advertising, where you turn something around quickly and the whole idea atmosphere, good ideaswhere a good ideas come from what makes both of those things work asit there's always communication and there's always ideas being processed. It's got to be happening constantly,it's not something you can turn a switch on and off right. You got to bemonitoring the environment right. You got to monitor the environment youexist in, but you also have to foster...

...a creative process where people arealways thinking and always coming up with something new, whether whereyou're, encouraging creative thought, i mean i've in the advertising business.I've never been a believer in creativity for creativity, sick you're,just creating smoke and not his fire, but developing developing an attitudeamong your your peers and your colleagues and your marketingdepartment. Whatever it is, always be thinking about stuff andwrite, you know, keep notes, keep em, we used call a morgue back in the dayyou you know, looking through magazines and things like that. If you saw areally nice ad that really struck your fans like this is strong, not justbecause you like to, but there were things about it that you understoodwhat made it good. You tore it off and you put it a morg yeah, because you yourun into a circumstance with with customers and with clients or wherethey need something. There's a message that needs to be told, and you know,there's a really good way to tell it and let's face it all the good creativewe come up with its inspired by something else. Nothing is made up fromwhole cloth. Okay, i'm sorry! Now, there's no new original ideas. Exactlyexactly i mean the whole emoji thing. Well, if the emoji signatus they couldhave had that idea, it was kind of the parts were prefabricated yeah forestcup was running and it was on a t shirt and then he gave it to the guy and theguys, like you know, that happens sometimes ye i'm goin to stop there,because i got this look from john he's, like just trying to think back of thescene. You know, i know what you're talking about so so yeah. I was like ai've gone to go to the game and i was going to do in in personation, but youhave that look on your face. You can do it, no, no go on. No, no! It's! Okay,just just to wrap up the thought! It's just if you, if you have good ideas, keepthem handy. If you've got good, i mean, and you may not have a it's like. I'vegot this tool, but i don't have a use for it right now. That's okay! You will,you will yeah, i can to calm swipe files. Now, not yes right! I have youknow i keep stuff. I keep screen shots and of a good email that i see you knowa black friday email, because i know i'm going to need it right in a yearand that's and that's not don't go around copying. Other people, creative,don't steal people's ideas. There's a there's! A fine line between betweenbeing influenced in a created direction by somebody else is working, just bakesa he's stealing it. Okay! Don't do that yeah! We do in web, we do snippets, youknow, codes a little different. There is some code where are like. I can'ttouch that, but you know we keep it like. I like that, like in in styling co, for example, youknow like how that drop shadow lands behind an image i like have that imagein that element is shaped and there's code that drives that and we may likecopy and pace that into a library, and we actually have on our on our remotedrives and stuff. Like laura, i have snippets and you will come in handysome day, yeah and then we have. I have tons of snippets for like like a awordpress developer like even though now there's tools that do it automatedi'm again, i've been around for twelve years and this used to have to handcode a lot of the arrays for custom post types, which now they call themcustom content types. I don't know anyway, barker day, you know we had tohand, that's my line. Yeah we had a hand coat all that, and i did- and ijust you know, saved it and then i've got like how do you do a widget whichthose were getting deprecated now and things like that. So there's, a lot ofcoding and custom features that i can roll in, because i just did a copy pace,because i know that code works and it's a very simple snippet to i mean thesearen't like expansive volumes of code, we're talking like six seven lines andsometimes i see developers create like hundreds of lines to do that. One thingand i'm like why you can actually find this on the internet. Here's a snippet,yeah, seri, serious! That's why it's called to snip it. You know so yeah. Wedo that too. For the audience the quiz next week will be on the word snip it.I think the most important thing to take away from this episode is what youjust brought to the table about a more because most people think dead bodiesand you just brought up like something completely different. I'm sorry! I came.I came up in a different era. I've...

...adapted to this one, but but that itstill pertains, i mean your pool. No, it is it's actually a good idea. I meanwe, you know we're talking about the same. In the same way, we just havethree different. I guess you could say branches of you know specialty heresame concept, but it's the same exact concept: yeah you have to havesomething that you're going to create a base and operate off of kind of like acolor palate. For example like these are the colors i'm going to use to makethis? Like that's kind of what you're doing you know, i mean everybody elseuses blue but you're using it for something different. I guess is a wayto maybe say that it's just things like that are the things that help you turn ideas around more quickly, but going back to the whole authenticthing you can just take somebody else's idea, repackage and throw it out thereand, and it be authentic. It's got it some way. It has contained your dnaright, yeah. Well, i think going back to that is like how do you? How do youfoster that culture, the creative culture within your organization- and ithink as much as you possibly can you know- read- decrease the amount ofspace between the people doing the work and the customer and the directengagement? Because i know you know in the past, i've even managed customersupport emails for any commerce brand and seeing the actual customer feedback.You know i was kind of in a director of marketing seat but manage that day today or at least overseeing it h and that's where all the good ideas camefrom always like we, you know you come up even with a a product bundle out ofa question that somebody asked in that product bundle. Then, within six months,is your best seller and it's like that's. You know that not really acreative thing, but it's a it's a it's a creative decision. In a sense, itinforms the creative yeah right. It's like when i've i've done several. Youknow testimonial video shoots using real customers of real products andbeing around them actually being on the shoot. You don't just see them for fiveminutes. They do their bit and they walk out. You spend hours with thesepeople, t you take them through wardrobe and makeup, and everything andand never around the fact that they just love going through that wholeprocess to make them feel like they are stars and but hearing them talk about hearing them. Talk about that brandhearing them talk about their real experience with it, the sincerity of it.That's in i mean that's all the value of a focus group without all the crap.It comes out of the focus group. Okay, because it's real it's honest, it'sanother quote for the show. It's unguarded what i mean right, it's likeit's like with reading the emails. These are people living in the momentand responding and interacting after a rise that that kind of just naturalhuman element, you don't know what you're going to get out of this person,so you you're going you're about studying them. In a sense, i meanyou're, very observant, yeah of what they're saying and how they're actingand the words are using and what's like developing a pran out your your brandpositioning and everything, and you know you're going to write copy andwe've done it. You know you write it in a way where you know your industry, andthis is what is typically said, and this is how it's typically explainfeature benefit yeah. All that, however, i m in a place for that ask your salesteam and what they're hearing and the questions they're getting and howthey're the people they're talking to are responding to them when they saythose things and what happens and and you start to feel you start to figureout really quickly like any place like you know, we talked about developingprocesses on the last show, like you can't really do that until you startactually trying to do stuff and observing and testing you know itrequires that you test in a smart way, of course, but at the end of the day,it's like if your sales team is like i'm getting a lot about this. I'mhearing this when i say this they associate to that. You know it's sortof like i'm trying to think i'm trying not to call anybody out. It is hard. It is hard and no it's notanybody. That's here speak easy, a guys, a work at nope. No,no, no! No! No one here because they'll turn off the mikes. It's not anyonehere! It's just that! You know. Sometimes you have to call the thingthe thing, because you've confused people by trying to be clever aboutcalling it something else, and i think...

...i can say it that way, because i knowthat mit, you hate clever and john. You hate puns, so don't do something likeyeah, i hate clever, just for the sake of being clever yeah yeah, otherwise itall like clever and service of the brand yeah clever, that's called smart.Those ads that mitch finds go into the morgue. Now, the more of that's kind of barrelshaped and small and sits on the floor gets emptied out on wednesdays ye rightnow. This is interesting because i mean there is that that invaluable input youget from the people that are out in the field, whether it's your sales team, whetherit's your marketing team, actually interacting with customers in like in asituation like i'm talking about sooting, you know testimonials, that'sthe real thing! The thing you don't do. If you want to stay authentic, the trapyou want to stay away from is sitting around that table with a bunch ofmarketing managers and eternal people who think they know well. I've beendoing this for, however long and we've always done it this way- and this iswhat's always worked- and i mean we've all run into that- i mean we've lived,it we've worked, it we've come bane done it ourselves, yeah, we done itwell, we be exactly you're actually taught that, and years ago i went to, iwent through eudemarec academy, and you know the one thing the guy kept sayingthrough all the courses was get out of the board room and if you have an idea,you know and you've talked to seventy people, and you talk to seven hundred,but you can't do that in the boardroom sitting across each other and doingthat you're just not going to get the idea whether or not if you even have a.If anybody even wants it, or even if it has value, you got to get out the boardroom and you got to talk to people, and i had a friend he had an idea problemis was very similar to something else, and you talk to seven people and i puthim in front of a angel investor and the guy was like no, it sounded good, but well yeah. I mean what have i meanlike one of my axioms and that is that advertise for if for a brand, youradvertising is a lousy mirror, because it's not the way you see the brand isnot the way the customer sees the brand. The way you see the brand inside thatheadquarters isn't the way the man on the street toseeing or woman on the street. Seize your brand you've got to getoutside the bubble. A hat in a sometime somebody sees to save with authentic issomebody sees something: that's not good, then you at least know how to fixthat, but you're fixing it from a position of you know being gene. Ireally want to fix that, because i don't want to project that you know youstill become authentic in that process, even though so, if you're out thereprojecting something sloppy and they're like you know, you're kind of sloppyand you go back and you fix it, that's okay! You fix that feedback wasconstructive and you're, not being disingenuous right with any. You don'thave to go physically out and do it. I mean we do it with a web design. Youknow we think we'd like to do it more frequently, but putting some kind ofheat mapping scroll. You know scroll tracking, analytics on there to see howpeople are atually using the website before you go in and do all the theheavy lifting of changing it same thing. With surveys before you go into a rebrand, i mean figure out what'simportant to your customers, so you don't just lop off something that issuper important. You've done that for like three three of our customers m andi think they've appreciated that we took the time on that. We just didn'thand them something. It was pretty and say: like was this okay right, i meanit's silly to just go pure into is and not that there there's always anelement of that and i p fifty fifty yeah, but let eseuta customer pays towell. That's a roman yeah yeah. It's like the last. The last thing, you'rekind of you want your count executive to walk into a marketing manager, anput creative down for them to say: do you like it right? Yeah, i mean it's.If you can remove that subjectivity, that's what you want to do. I mean as abusiness owner, you don't want any uncertainty about your next move yeah.So if you can minimize that and i a a lot of freedom to do design at thatpoint was now. They trust you because you're basing it like design isactually cold and calculated. It's not...

...all like. I feel like i'm going topaint a pretty tree today, like that's, not really design, that's art, you know.So you know design is very cold and calculated methodical. It has a processlike if you really do it professionally, for a living you're like, and you stillenjoyable to do, no wrong on that. But there's those thingsthat you need to know what's going on. The beauty in creative and advertisingis that it accomplishes its goal in the best manner, most effective matterpossible. That's the beauty and effective creative in the in marketingand advertising. If you want to go paint picassos just for the sing ofmaking aesthetically pretty things, there are dam, few brands in the universe that have that kind of luxury andflexibility, because that's not why people buy or partake in it they betaken it because it has some value to them, makes their life better and it'susually not just being pretty so. I've always said we're more. Likeengineers, i mean whether it's on the account side, whether it's on themanagement side, whether it's on the creative, like we build highlyefficient machines that do a really really great job at what they'redesigned to do and that's how we build brands and and and that's the it has tobe authentic. That's a part of that's a part of that's a part of the schematic. If you for building that machine, is itauthentic because if it's not you've built something for not to year brandand that's kind of the thing that i've struggled with until i kind of saw it,you know in person with i mean an example of of, i think, a real branddoing it that i've been involved with at least is a cb brand, and thatindustry is, you, know, ripe with scams and m l, ms and you know just and crowdthink right, right and just uncertain d about the effectiveness, and you knowpseudo science and things like that to the point where you know they leaned heavily into thefact that we grow our own hemp on our own farm. It's usda certified organic,the farm, and so there were that was authentic to them. That was somethingthat you know. There are very few farms in the united states who can genuinelyclaim usda certified, and so it's different gate and all thatgood stuff. And so it's like you have to find those little nuggets ofdifferentiation for your brand and what's authentic to your brand. What'sreal for you! It's not just like! I don't know that it's a it's hard to itis branding. I mean if, if you're going to do it well, it is finding thoselittle nuggets within your company and they may not exist and that's kind ofwhere things get scary. Yeah, it's funny. Im sinner thing is you'retelling talking about this. I'm thinking about so like in the in thebourbon industry, for example. There's so many now m and bourbon has a very distinct way inwhich it's made. Otherwise, it's not bourbon right rightlegally right, so i'm sinner thinking how difficult it must be. Aside from who started the brand okay,they all use the same basic ingredients m. It's like beer! Sorry, sorry don'twant to offend anyone. I, but it's your hate mail to mitch at it's the difficulty outcome. Thedifficulty in i mean part of what makes it authentic are those things all the things youjust mentioned, like with the c bd about you know: certified organic farm,not just the plan itself, but the whole process the whole place in which it'smake grown action. I e right in telling an authentic story aroundthose things, not just the elements themselves, but telling a story. That'sauthentic, around them, and you look at like in the liquor industry, and imentioned burbon. That seems to be how they get traction to by okay. It'ss, not just the things themselves. It's...

...the stories behind those elmets thatbuild an authentic story, so it s it has to be more than just theauthenticity of the product itself. It's that story about where thosethings came from and the philosophy that built it. A that's in your brand.It's in a brand godliness i mean is one of the key things that should be. Thereis the brand story so that everybody knows when they go when they look atthat document. It's like! Oh, okay, that's that's the origin story! That'show this that's! How we got started. This is how this happened. This is whatwe stand for is our mission, blah blah blah blah yeah, and it's all rightthere with bourbon. It's our usually right there on the label like workingwith the old forester. It was first bottot bourbon, whether or not it'strue or not. Here's a lot of historical disagreements with first bot out ofburbon george garvan brown. You know the founder and the first guy involvedhis picture still on the label, the old classic. You know old photo of him yepand the only burban before during an asterprohibition which again debate right, but what eliga craig m, supposedly the firstbourbon bottled and it was bottled by a baptist minister. I was thinking that as he was talking,but they stick a claim as being like the original bourbon. But it's in such this is a whole other podcast.We really should think about doing in a crowded market place of of a certainproduct segment like bourbon, where they're, so the crowd is so it'slike it's there's. So many you all you see is brown. You know what i mean: youcan't see the labels, you see all these brown bottles, how extremely difficultit is to to tell an authentic story thatmakes you stand out from the rest of the crowd well and onthat, because we want wrap up here is that you know i've. I think i believe,though atis minister making bourbon, because i too have been in deaconmeetings and thought man. I could use it during so anyway with that, if you want to like check out nerdbrand, how we build brands see the faces of the team met, us can go ner,brandam, it yeah or maybe just skip over mitch's face. I don't know it's upto you. I want to scare the kids yeah scare, kids john tell the people theycan find us on social anywhere anywhere. Just look for us. We're had in er brand agency prettymuch anywhere, yeah, so consistency and then yeah. You want to check out thispodcast and go to gosh anywhere as well. You can go to apple itunes. Google playmodify yep, so sounder, sounder fm yep all of those places, and you can findit primarily on ner brand agency podcast did you mention youtube? Yes,this is on youtube. So, if you're watching this, please click the belllike subscribe and apparently there's a thing going on where they got rid ofthe dislike button. I don't care not like us, but i am i'm going to sayofficially. I still have the dislike buttons, so i kind of feel like i'mbeing thoulder printing, the public dislike count, they're, not showing thenumber publicly. You can still see it on the back end, oh as the creator orwhatever oh they're, not showing the public dislike counts any more. For idon't know, that's so inauthentic! That's a and on that note, that's going toconclude this episode. The nerra podcast. Thank you for getting in akeepin her in.

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