NerdBrand
NerdBrand

Episode · 2 months ago

Mastering Authentic Marketing

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this episode of the NerdBrand podcast we talk about avoiding your consumer's BS meter.

Authentic marketing actually requires you, the marketer, to be a fan of the services or product you are marketing. Without that connection, marketing efforts can be inauthentic in which the audience could pick up on, and ignore the brand entirely.

Branding sets the stage for creating that connection for the marketers because of how the brand looks, sounds, and feels to them. Therefore inspiring creative and effective marketing campaigns.

Also, as a bonus we discuss “fast-vertising” (a term Reynolds coined), which involves treating real-time cultural moments as a springboard, to build their own brand buzz. Rapid deployment of your ads is related to this method, which can create authentic moments, but be careful as not everything is humorous, or timely. Essentially READ THE ROOM.

For example: The Peloton ad (in response to the Me Too movement) was 72 hours from conception to production complete for distribution.

Mitch just checking his phone. Iyou know, right at the beginning of the EPP. Yeah, I'm sorry, it started buzzing. It's I know, I never I heard lay mode numberone. I. You're fired. I never again. What are theirVand podcast? Everybody, I'm your host days and this is Mitch and that'sJohn, and today we're talking about mastering authentic marketing. So basically it's tryingto kind of ties into what I just said. It doesn't endit avoids theBS meters I've written here on the note, because your consumers they can smell that, so don't do it. Authentic marketing actually requires you, the marketer, be a fan of the service or product you're marketing. Without that connection, marketing efforts can be in authentic, in which the audience could pick upand ignore the brand identity entirely. So what do you guys think? That'sthe whole episode. There we go. All right, well, good,thanks and come back next time. And Andrews, job easy, I mean, I mean I've said this over and over and over again. Like manythings, it's people have so many ways now to find out how authentic orhow real you are. They can go to they can google you. Theycan look at you on social media and if they're not getting a if they'renot getting the same vibe from all those sources versus the interaction they may actuallyhave with your brand in a transaction, they're going to find out very quickly. Or if what you're saying about your brand in your marketing, they're goingto know pretty fast these days if people find out things instantaneously, Google,social media, whatever the case. Yeah, yeah, I mean you're trying toattract trust from an audience. I mean that's really what you're trying todo. You're trying to build trust are as a rupp a pool. Idon't know how to say it right, Repp a pool. You know,I'll tell you, guys, this rapport if one of you were taken hostageand they were like, if you don't spell this word correctly, your friendis going to die, and if that word is restaurant, it's been reallynice knowing youtube. Yeah, because I would be like ours trenday. Idon't wear exactly. We're exactly. Does her on? Yeah, we're exactly. Does the AU fall in the spelling? I always you know, is ithere? Is it here? It's the left side for sure, littleleft side right. I mean for authentic, because everybody says it. You know, this has been the thing, be authentic. Yeah, it's beenthe marketing thing for, I don't know, probably forever in some form of fashion. But that phrase in itself since, I I feel like it's about sixor seven years when social came about. People were like, Oh, yeah, really be authentic on social you got to be real, right.What is that mean? Well, anything, he's don't wake up in the morningand then, you know, try to present yourself like this is howI look when I wake up in the morning, you know, because that'ssort of becoming like a movie trope with certain films that deal with, youknow, situational dramas or whatever. It's like, yeah, everybody like onInstagram, is not really how they look. No, yeah, I know,Shocker, I'm stunned. Yeah, you know. Yeah, well,it's I think probably this, this whole. I mean, I am your well, you know, you know. I mean, I didn't. That'sprobably the advent of all this. It started, the drum beat really startedwith social media because that was the door to showing your authentic you. Well, it also became the door to being in authentic exactly. You set upthis separate life or whatever. As a brand, you set up this sortof you try to set up this separate identity. In a sense, youtry to be what you think the public wants to see perception, but youhave to actually be that and people can pick up on it pretty easily.Yeah, I mean we have met,...

...all three of us have met andworked with or for people that we've seen that or not authentic and sometimes andsenses and ways that are just incredibly demonstrative. Is What is that? A workiesfor that? I if you want to. I mean the poor I'mthe senior member here, so I've got a longer history to deal with,but I can tell you that's just the nature. Unfortunately, in the advertisingand Marketing Universe. You're going to get a lot of that. Yeah,yeah, well, I mean that's because the whole point of advertising marketing isto project an image, right anyway. So it's all them sell you onwhy you should do yeah, so, obviously, but sometimes I just thinkthat, you know, you had to be careful, like with your brandanyways, because, like we've talked about on the last show with Mary Reid, was you know, the people in your company are going to talk aboutthe brand, they're going to talk about the business, they're going to bebought into the mission and everything. And so when that happens it's very organicto talk about it, discuss it and those personalities like there's no inauthenticness whateverto it, right because you actually are bought it and believe it and likethey're not going to try to conform and you know like Oh yeah, I'mtotally bought into this thing, and in the back of their mind they're likeGod, I just rather be someplace else. Oh well, I mean, Imean how many of us, I mean who've worked for like a largercorporation, and part of your orientation, whether it's whether it's said, youknow, literally or otherwise, there's always that kind of in they're trying toget you to buy into the brand at the beginning because, and we've preachesJohn, you we've talked about this. You know, being an authentic brandstarts internally. You have to actually believe and live and perform m the wayyour brand says it does and you have to have that same attitude internally.Otherwise when you try to project it, you're projecting something that isn't real andpeople, again, back to said earlier, there's ways I can pick up veryquickly on whether or not that's the case. Yeah, so let's talkabout the the one person that's in the show notes the kind of like we'veseen do this really well and actually coined to phrase called fast vertising. Okay, MMM, many, many of latched onto this and they started defining itand I'm just like wait a minute, okay, look, Ryan Reynolds actuallycame up with this. So well you, hey, everybody, let's cut andask Ryan Reynolds what he has to say, and then at that pointin this podcast you're probably going like, oh, cool, you got RyanReynolds on the show. Now we don't. Sorry, my close enough. Yeah, that's enough. anyways. It involves treating real time cultural moments.is a springboard to build their own brand buzz. Rapid deployment of your adsis related to this method, which can create authentic moments, but be careful, because not everything is humorous or timely. Essentially, read the room right.We know your end, which goes to know your audience. It's it'srelated. Know it not, and knowing your audience isn't just about knowing whatthey like and what they're about, but where they are in that moment intime, what's happening around them. Yeah, because I hope Pellat on thing.They turn that around really quick and if they had done that, likesix months after that had happened, but yeah, the nobody would have madethe connection. And you know, a big part of push that along wasthe industry. Folks were like, Holy Crap, how did well do that? That's so quickly, right, and that was spot on. You know, how did you get that creative that quickly produce, you know, anddistribute? That's the other half. I found. I found an interview thathe did and he said that it was in the it was in the aroundseventy two hours from concept to production to complete distribution. Seventy two hours.When you have a good idea, you know, yeah, well, yousit on it well and you have the resources to get the wheels in motion, you know what I mean? Yeah, when you can pick up the phoneand start calling people saying, okay, we have to do this now.I mean you have to have resources,...

...both human and otherwise, at theready to be able to pull something like that off. and not everybodycan do that. Well, just think about how long it takes us toget a bar to do a photo shoot or video shooting. You know,they you know, he could call anybody and be like Hey, I'm RyanReynolds and I'd like to shoot up commercially right in your bar. Oh yeah, anybody would drop for that. I'd be like yeah, come on in, like well, in a prime time when you get that, that doesn'tmatter as Ryan Reynolds, but yeah, there's a little bit of at that. That said, what do you guys think about the fact that this kindof going the term around digital, this digital universe we live in and havingpretty ready access to resources to produce content? Hasn't that made it easier for peopleto turn on a dime in a way that maybe they couldn't in thepast and get create something and get it out quickly? Because you've got digitalcameras, because you've got computers, because you've got ipads and IPHONES, etc. You can, you can literally turn around and produce content in a matterof hours rather than days of weeks by yourself. Right. Yeah, well, see, the thing is with this whole with the Peloton, Ryan ReynoldsY had, I mean his branding agency, not as built around his him.You know, I mean the creative director. Yeah, I mean he'sa creative director of it. For those that don't know and you know itliterally, one of the mission statements is that this brand agency serves Ryan Reynoldsis wilms and mean that's kind of the tone. Is Good instincts, though. Yeah, that's the tone of the brand. He's he. That's it. So when you know the tone, when you know yourself, you canturn around things very quickly because everybody kind of understands the direction we're going in, because you know Ryan Reynolds doesn't sound like you know Johnny Carson or whatever. You know. It's like, I know, I really went way backthere, didn't. I know who that is? Yeah, I wasn't.I don't know when he left the tonight show, but I do remember JayLennil got it. But I'm then. I think I'm that. Yeah,I was in high school. I was born. It was one thousand ninehundred and ninety. I think. I I was a huge fan since Iwas a little boy. Yeah, anyways, I digress. You're not that person. So it's pretty easy to kind of like spit out something in seventytwo hours. But what you were saying, John, it's still you got toget the location. Well, yeah, I mean it's all all the logisticsand then actually filming something that's worthy. You know, your Ada may notcome to life as you planned. And then again, distribution, gettingit out there, getting it to you, to button him money mind it,maybe I don't know how they did it, but starting to generate thatbuzz, which it helps, if you're right. And renalds, you gota twitter following, you know, but there are some built ins. Yeah. Yeah, you can't really distribute content if you don't have that many followersor not many people listening or paying attention where you so you better say somethingpretty catchy. M to get that old turn or not, to get thatorgan to get that organic reach. He worked for it, you know,if you think about it, it just text time. I mean he waswhen he was eighteen or nineteen and he was working like the graveyard shift ata grocery store stock and shows. So like he came from that what heis now. Yeah, yeah, I mean if he was still the RyanReynolds back in the day when he did the movie called waiting, which,if any of you have never seen that whole my God, that'll give youan eye opener about that universe. Don't watch that. It's not kid friendly. Don't watch that. But he was a really you know. But ifhe was still that stage in his career as an actor, then no,of course not. You know, I mean it, he has evolved inhis career and as a person like tremendously now. But if you think aboutit, you've watched, if you've seen waiting, he's still essentially yeah,he still has that personality that has sharp as they married. Yea. Yeah, but you know, even though he's probably not wanting to be fond ofthe memories of it, but in green lantern is when he met his wife. You know, at least I guess something good came of it. Thatwas the only thing I think that he would probably say that did. Butyou know, he's he's kind of grown now. He's retired from acting,at least it seems that way. I...

...think he's the sabbatical. He's nothaving to jump on every offer that comes across the table. He's got thatluxury. He's I mean there's another actor that's also in the works in theadvertising realm. It serves as creative director. who kind of is, isn't thatsame? Yeah, completely different personality, same in that same occupies that samespace, and that is Matthew mcconaughey. I mean he's the creative director forall right, all right, all right, don't do it. Well, I know he hesitated. Body thought about it. I did, tellybodywas going checked out right, you checked there, you know, made eyecontact. Not Okay, but you didn't waive me off. So I waslike, I'm doing it. I knew something was got. Didn't know whatwas coming, but something was coming out anyway. I was curious. Hewas the creative director for wild Turkey. Uh Huh, that sounds right.That can for a campaign and I don't know if us the creative director up. He's the most visible face for Cadillac now. But yeah, he's anotherof those guys who has a has probably, I'm not sure, his instincts,maybe, or is good as Ryan Reynolds? Well, I think thathe's not bad that I can ever met the guys. Yeah, well,maybe, but if you you watch their if you look at their body ofwork, and I'm talking on the advertising type stuff, for one thing,reynolds is just prolific. I mean there's a wireless company out of Canada hedoes work for. There's some kind of low carb cookie or something. He'sdone work for us, you know, on facebook. I mean he hasa pretty broad repertoire. Yeah, yeah, and he's being himself. I meanhe's being I mean that's the whole thing about authenticity. I mean,you don't you could literally watch the movie deadpool or the series, and Idon't know if there's a third one coming or not, but I mean youcould watch it and then you watch like what he does in that world andyou're like, yeah, that's that's the same guy. Quirk Quirky, funny, very quick witted, which is interesting. I mean kind of a decide.Not If you if you've seen any the handful of more serious roles he'sdone, he can do it. I mean he does serious stuff. Well, yeah, yeah, but they average stuff, since got the same tone. It is similars. Yeah, that's kind of the point. It's abrand. Yah. Yeah, and you remember the ads. I mean Istill remember the ads that he's done and he's been putting his name and hisagency behind and I remember them. I mean, so there's that authenticity alsocreates that memorable you know. HMM that. Yeah, I don't know what theword is. I'm just going to stop because I was just strew itup. Like four of them in this podcast. It's interesting because you lookat mcconaughey and you look at Ryan Reynolds. Not that won't make the whole podcastabout those two. I'm sure there's others. Well, we had soit's okay. Yeah, yeah, I mean we're talking about authentic marketing.So these are the two the kind of there's probably many people listening or word. Really, they don't know that that's what these guys do. They don't. They just see them as their roles in the movies and think like Oh, yeah, that's the guy that you know, made a you know,does the right right, and it's the other guy that was dead bull.That's probably did it again. Yeah, that might be the limp. Yeah, but I didn't try to imitate. I'm leaving anyway. They probably justdon't. You never know, they may not know that. Oh, Ididn't know they were creative directors of, you know, these bank like Iwhen you mentioned the Cadillac thing, my mind did immediately go to not thecommercials that he did, but it went to the Jim Carrey snl where he'slike pretending to roll a bigger they made fun of that like that was outlike when those commercials came out. Jim Carrey was on SNL and that cameout like obviously Saturday night. I don't remember. I do all is hilarious. It was as he was impersonating Matthew mcconaughey and the commercials driving and Iwas mentioning like how he's rolling there, because I didn't see that part,but I saw some of them, some of the other impersonations. It's Imean the reason, I mean I think the reason why whild Turkey went tomcconaughey and Cadillac for that reason is I think there's an authenticy authenticity about those, about them as actors, that comes through in the roles that it's consistentin the same thing with Ryan Reynolds. But again, I go back.It's just really interesting. Ryan roads is really planned a flag in the marketingand advertising side of things. Is something...

...he really has a has a heartfor, and I'm MC Kina Haey's kind of like I think I'll do thisbecause it sounds fun and it's I mean it's authentic and the work is prettygood, but you can tell the round rolls his it his it's in hisblood. He really enjoys it. He's not just doing it because he wantsis looking for another revenue stream, which I'm sure that helps. Yeahs reallyenergy. Yeah, got an energy. Yeah, which I mean a goodmarketer, good advertiser, has a certain energy about them typically. Well,he's an entrepreneur, M and that's, you know, I mean Aviation Gen. I mean he sold that for what, one hundred seventy million something. Soldit. Yeah, he did. He's told he still does so thosepromotional work for it. Yeah, yeah, so, you know, I meanas far as his I think he kind of lashed on the ideays like, wait a minute, if I want to play in these different areas andI'll just be a branding agency which just do that and then I get toplay there. Any other cool thing that they do is to I mean theydo, like if you look at their website and what they do, Imean they're they're in a market that I would love to be in it,but they're editing movie trailers and they're involved with the studios in promotion of thosemovies. I would love to do that because I have a heart for Ilove movies obviously. So you know, I'd love to, you know,do some movie trailers and stuff like that, and that'd be fun in a worldwhere Jason is performed producing movie trailers. I'm leaving again. I think you'rejealous because we've got some like impersonation shops and we haven't heard. I'mwaiting for my opportunity. He waiting for your opportunity. Okay, yeah,I'm just kind of curious what you gotten in the like to. I'm tryingto you know, it's it's one day, not something you playing. Yeah,it's going to explode. We're going to go what? Yeah, allof a sudden we're going to be sitting here talking and also we got PeterGriffin on the show. or it's like wait, hold on, that's probablynot be awesome. That's probably not it. Well, if it's spongebob, I'mleaving the show. That I would say. That's probably even less likegood word, maybe Patrick Start and I'm getting I'm getting a starfish vibe.Yeah, all right, cool around and yeah, it is interesting. Ithink got back on track. It is interesting. I'm trying to steers back. We're kind of moved off the south road. It is interesting. Imean, again, going back to the decades and decades and decades of experiencesin this business, there is a performance you make yourself. Sounds so anchibecause sometimes I feel it. There's a performance angle in this business, evenif you're not in in front of the camera, the being kind of behindit, whether it's producing video, advertising, print, digit whatever the case,there is a performance vibe to it. You are you're creating in your crafting, and I'm sure that's probably another reason why these people like Reynolds anda kind of Hay gravitate toward it, because it's another it's another way toperform. Yeah, it's another way. Did it to exercise those skills andand that desire, but in a different I don't know anybody thinking that fastrotizing means like spur the moment and unplanned, not strategic. Just pick up thephone and turn the camera and start hitting record right until the personally theside do a thing that's haphazard. Yeah, now, that's not what that's notwhat they do. Obviously that seventy two hours and everything they'd like theyobviously that was something that I think there was some interviews at while back whenthe first deadpool movie came out, and he was doing like, you know, what Robert Downey JR would call selling soap and, you know, dothe talk show circuit interviews and all that. Ryan reils doing the same thing andhe was talking to them and he's like he was texting the marketing guysbillboard ideas and they just started talking emojis for deadpool and it was just theskull, the Pooh and the L and that was the entire billboard and hesaid he'say. The marketing guys were like we're going to do that and hesaid, you don't have the guts, and then sure enough they did,you know, and it's like I think that that's how how that works.He has that team on the back supporting him and they're like yeah, there'sthat just synergy, as they say,...

...you know, and I think thatthat's why. But that's still not haphazard. That's still staying in line with thepersonality that that they're trying to you know, project and put out there. You know, they it's just the way it is. Well, andit goes back to authenticity again and that is been that that was a realmoment that somebody had, that had a real unique, strong creative idea andthe ability to take advantage of it quickly. And there's just there's some industries,I think, some products, some services were that's easier to do becausebecause the goal of the out of bounds lines are so wide, you've gotso much room to play. Yeah, it's harder, I think, ifyou have a product that's more narrow that maybe maybe, and maybe I'm wrong, but as I'm saying this, I'm one I'm saying guessing myself. It'sstill if it's a products server that has a very narrow focus, maybe it'sharder. I don't see. It's harder to the probably it's harder in it. It's harder to think that open, you know what I mean, tohave that big of a playground to play in it. I mean there's there'sbudget considerations, there's, you know, timing and till that's there's so muchluck involved with it too. I mean you can have the greatest idea inthe world but uh hum, if you don't distribute it at the right time, you if you distribute it the right way if you don't distribute it atthe right time, like if something major had happened the day that he releasedthat on twitter, because pitter is really where that that whole conversation around thePeloton and that turnaround, you know, generated conversation and then it hit thepress and all that stuff. But if something major had taken the headlines thatday, your great idea, you know, it's a different story. It's gone. Yeah, well, it's happening and buried. It happened in nertculture years ago. I remember when DC comics killed superband. There was literallynothing going on in the news that day and that had hit everywhere because theywere like, who's going to war with soands? No, nobody. Everybodyseems to be fine today. And then all of a sudden somebody came inand said, I just read DC called me they killed Superman, like what? And then they ran with that and that literally became a thing. Andyou know. So, yeah, like what you said, a lot ofhas a timing and luck and there is those elements as sometimes when you dosomething that you know you have to. That's right. I think it's importantfor for other brands who aren't, you know, of this, this stature. Like just because one idea didn't work at it doesn't mean that the channelsbroken and doesn't mean that you're you know, your team is broken. You know, there's all kinds of variables that you kind of just have to keepiterating. And again, there's always a hint of luck and any advertising.Yeah, it's going to actually catch on with the audience that you went infor it to catch on or different audience. Yeah, because news. They killedBatman too, but newbody heard about that? Not it didn't. Justheard about it. Yeah, it didn't. They they didn't kill him. Hewas severely wounded. Well, now they've killed him twice, I see. The first time was dark side killed him and then the second time thejoker did in a cave. A Scott Snyder his run. That's when theystarted defining the job. I don't know why we're talking about this on thewell, I just get showed up, as I did shown up. I'venever been a huge Batman. Yeah, I'm the DC guy. He's themoral guy and that's why he will seal school me on like, you know, Danils and all that stuff. I didn't got a clue about. Likewhose squirrel role is or anything. Well, I'm not touching it. I'm nottouching that, leaving it alone, but I mean it. It's interesting. I mean, in order to this, this kind of crosses into the wholeyou know, rap what you would call like rapid response advertising. Wecould turn something around quickly and the whole idea atmosphere, good ideas. Wheretwo good ideas come from? What makes both of those things work? Asif there's always communication and there's always ideas being processed. It's got to behappening constantly. It's not something you can turn a switch on and off.Right, you got to be monitoring the environmenter right, you've got to monitorthe environment you exist in. But you...

...also have to foster a creative processwhere people are always thinking and always coming up with something new. Whether therewere, you're encouraging creative thought. I mean, I've in the advertising business. I've never been a believer in creativity for creativity sake. You're just creatingsmoke and fire, but developing, developing an attitude among your your peers andyour colleagues and your your marketing department, whatever it is, always be thinkingabout stuff and right, you know, keep notes, keep them. Whatwe call a morgue. Back in the day, you you know, lookingthrough magazines and things like that, if you saw a really nice ad thatreally struck your fans that this is strong, not just because you liked a bit, there were things about it that you understood what made it good,you tore it off and you put it in a morgue. Yeah, becauseyou you run into a circumstance with with customers and with clients where where theyneed something, there's a message that needs to be told and you know there'sa really good way to tell it. And, let's face it, allthe good creative we come up with it's inspired by something else. Nothing ismade up from whole cloth. Okay, I'm sorry now. There's no neworiginal ideas. Exactly exactly. I mean the whole emoji thing. Well,if the EMOJI sticking is this, they couldn't have had that idea. Itwas kind of the parts were prefabricated. Yeah, forest coup was running andit was on a t shirt and then he gave it to the guy andthe guys like you know, that happens sometimes. I'm going to stop therebecause I got this look from Johnny's like just don't trying to think back ofthe scene. Yeah, I know it's talking about so so. Yeah,I was like, I've going to go through the I was going to doan impersonation, but if you have that look on your face, you cando it. No, no, go on, not's okay, just start. Just to wrap up the thought. It's just if you, if youhave good ideas, keep them handy. If you've got good I mean,and you may not have a's like, I've got this tool but I don'thave a use for it right now. That's okay, you will, youwill. I can call them swipe files now, not more. Yes, right, I have. You know, I keep stuff. I keep screenshotsand a good email that I see, you know, a black Friday email, because I know I'm going to need it right in a year.And that's and that's not don't go around copying other people's creative don't steal people'sideas. There's a there's a fine line between between being influenced in a createddirection by somebody else's working just Baker's stealing it. Okay, don't do that. Yeah, we do in Web we do snippets. You know, codeslittle different. There is some code we were like I can't touch that,but you know, we keep it like. I like that, like in installingcode, for example. You know, I like how that drop shadow landsup behind an image. I like how that image in that element isshaped and there's code that drives that and we may like copy and paste thatinto a library and we actually have on our on our remote drives and stufflike. Laura and I have snippets and you will come in handy Sunday.Yeah, and then we have I have tons of snippets for like like asa word press developer, like, even though now there's tools to do itautomated. I'm again, I've been around for twelve years in this. Usedto have to hand code a lot of the arrays for custom post types,which now they call them custom content types. I don't know. Anyway, Markand day, you know, we had to hand that's my line.Yeah, we had to hand colade all that and I did and I just, you know, saved it. And then I've got like how do youdo a widget, which those were getting deprecated now, and things like that. So there's a lot of coding and custom features that I can just rollin because I just did a copy past because I know that code works andit's a very simple snippet to I mean, these aren't like expansive volumes of Code. We're talking like six, seven lines, and sometimes I see developerscreate like hundreds of lines to do that one thing and I'm like why,you can actually find this on the Internet. Here's a snippet. Yeah, serious, that's why it's called a snippet. You know. So, yeah,we do that too for the audience. The quiz next will be on theword snippet. I think the most important thing to take away from thisepisode is what you just brought to the table about am morgue, because mostpeople think dead bodies and you just brought up like something completely different. I'msorry, I came I came up in a different era. I've adapted tothis one, but but they still pertains.

I mean your point it is it'sactually a good idea. I mean we, you know, we're talkingabout the same in the same way. We just have three different, Iguess you could say, branches of you know, specialty here, same concept, but it's the same exact concept. Yeah, yeah, you have tohave something that you're going to create a base and operate off of kind oflike a color Palette, for example, like these are the colors I'm goingto use to make this like that's kind of what you're doing, you know. I mean everybody else uses blue, but you're using it for something different. I guess is a way to maybe say that it's just things like thator things that help you turn ideas around more quickly. But going back tothe whole authentic thing, you can just take somebody else's idea, repackage itand throw it out there and it and it be authentic. It's got itsome way. It has contained your DNA. I'm right. Yeah. Well,I think going back to that a is like how do you how doyou foster that culture, that creative culture, within your organization? And I thinkas much as you possibly can, you know, read decrease the amountof space between the people doing the work in the customer and then direct engagement, because I know, you know, in the past I've even managed customersupport emails for or any commerce brand and seeing the actual customer feedback. Youknow, I was kind of a director of marketing seat. But manage thatDaytoday, or at least overseeing it, Huh. And that's where all thegood ideas came from. It's like we, you know, you come up evenwith a product bundle out of a question that somebody asked, and thatproduct bundle then within six months as your best seller and it's like that's,you know, that not really a creative thing, but it's a it's ait's a created decision. In a sense, it informs the creative yeah, right. It's like when I've I've done several, you know, testimonial videoshoots, using real customers of real products and being around them, actually beingon the shoot. You you don't just see them for five minutes, theydo their bit and they walk out. You spend hours with these people.You take them through wardrobe and and makeup and everything and and never mind thefact that they just love going through that whole process and it makes them feellike there are stars on but hearing them talk about hearing them talk about thatbrand, hearing them talk about their real experience with it, the sincerity ofit that's in I mean that's all the value of a focus group without allthe crap it comes out of the focus group. Okay, because it's real, it's honest. There's another quote for the show it's unguarded, and Imean right. It's like it's like with reading the emails. These are peopleliving in the moment and responding and interacting after a record rates. That kindajust natural human element. You don't know what you're going to get out ofthis person. So here you're kind of of your about studying them in asense. I mean you're very observant, yeah, of what they're saying andhow they're acting in the words are using and what's like developing a Priyan theyour your brand positioning and everything, and you know you're going to write copy, and we've done it. You know, you write it in a way whereyou know your industry and this is what is typically said and this ishow it's typically explain feature benefit. Yeah, all that, however, is aplace for that. Ask yoursels team and what they're hearing and the questionsthey're getting and how they're the people they're talking to are responding to them whenthey say those things and what happens and and you start your fearl you startto figure out really quickly, like any place, like you know, wetalked about developing processes on the last show. Like you can't really do that untilyou start actually trying to do stuff and observing and testing. Right,you know, it requires that you test in a smart way, of course, but at the end of the day it's like if your sales team islike, I'm getting a lot about this, I'm hearing this, when I saythis, they associate to that. You know, it's sort of likeI'm trying to think, I'm trying not to call anybody out. It ishard. It is hard. And now it's not anybody that's here. SpeakEasy, guys networking at NOP. Nope, nope, nope, nope, noone here because they'll turn off the mics. It's not anyone here.It's just that, you know, sometimes you have to call the thing thething because you've confused people about trying to be clever by calling it something else. And I think I can say it...

...that way because I know that Mitch, you hate clever and John you hate punks. So don't do something what? Yeah, I hate clever just for the sake of been clever. Yeah, yeah, otherwise it like clever in service of the brand. Yeah,Clavers, that's called SMART. Those ads that Mitch finds God into the morgue. No, the more that's kind of barrel shaped and small and sits onthe floor gets emptied out on Wednesdays. Yeah, right now. This isinteresting because, I mean there is that that invaluable input you get from thepeople they're out in the field, whether it's your sales team, whether it'syour marketing team, actually interacting the customers in it like in a situation likeI'm talking about, shooting, you know, testimonials. That's the real thing,the thing you don't do if you want to stay authentic, the thetrap you want to stay away from is sitting around that table with a bunchof marketing managers and internal people who think they know. Well, I've beendoing this for however long and we've always done it this way and this iswhat's always worked. And I mean we've all run into that. I meanwe've lived it, we've worked it, we've combated done it ourselves. Herewe don't. Well, we yeah, exactly. You're actually taught that.In years ago, I went to went through you didn't me, start upacademy and you know, the one thing that guy kept saying through all thecourses was get out the board room and if you have an idea, youknow and you've talked to seventy people, you talk to seven hundred. Butyou can't do that in the board room, sitting across each other and doing thatyou're just not going to get the idea whether or not if you evenhave a if anybody even wants it, or if even it is as value. You got to get out the board room and you got to talk topeople. And I had a friend he had an idea. Problem is itwas very similar or something else, and you talk to seven people and Iput him in front of an angel investor and a guy was like no,it sounded good, but well, yeah, I mean what I mean, likeone of my axioms, and that is the advertise for if for abrand, you're advertising as a Lousy Mirror because it's not the way you seethe brand. Is Not the way the customer sees the brand. The wayyou see the brand inside that headquarters isn't the way the man on the streetto seeing or woman on the street seize your brand. You've got to getoutside the bubble. Ye, gotta get out there, out of the world. Sometimes if somebody sees to say with authentic as, somebody sees something that'snot good. Then you least know how to fix that, but you're fixingit from a position of, you know, being gene. I really want tofix that because I don't want to project that. You know, youstill become authentic in that process, even though. So if you're out thereprojecting something sloppy and you're in they're like, you know, you're kind of sloppy, and you go back and you fix it, that's okay, youfixed it, that could feedback was constructive and you're not being disingenuous right withanyone. You don't have to go physically out and do it. I meanwe do it with a web design, you know. I think we'd liketo do it more frequently, but putting some kind of heat mapping, scroll, you know, scroll tracking analytics on there to see how people are actuallyusing the website before you go in and do all the the heavy lifting ofchanging it. Same thing with surveys before you go into a rebrand. Imean figure out what's important to your customers so you don't just lop off somethingthat is super important. We've done that for like three three of our customersMMM and I think they've appreciated that. We took the time on that.We just didn't handle something that was pretty and say, like was this okay? Right, I mean it's silly to just go peer intuition. Not thatthere. There's always an element of that. It's probably fifty. Yeah, butwhat depends so much? The customer pays too. Well, that's whatI mean. Yeah. Yeah, it's like the last the last thing.You're kind of you want your count executive to walk into a marketing manager andput creative done from them to take. Do you like it? Right?Yeah, I mean it's if you can remove that subjectivity. That's what youwant to do. I mean, as a business owner, you don't wantany uncertainty about your next move. Yeah, so if you can minimize that andyou have a lot of freedom to do design at that point, becausenow they trust you because you're basing it. Like design is actually cold and calculated. It's not all like I feel...

...like I'm going to paint a prettytree today, like that's not really design, that's art, you know. Soyou know, design is very cold and calculated, methodical. It hasa process. Like if you really do it professionally for a living, you'relike and you still enjoyable to do I mean wrong on that, but there'sthose things that you need to know what's going on. The beauty in creativeand advertising is that it accomplishes its goal in the best manner, most effectivematter possible. MMM, that's the beauty and effective creative in the marketing andadvertising. If you want to go paint Picasso's just for the saying of makingesthetically pretty things, there are damn few brands in the universe that have thatkind of luxury and flexibility, because that's not why people buy or partake init. They pret taken it because it has some value to the makes theirlife better and it's usually not just being pretty. So I've always said we'remore like engineers. I mean, whether it's on the account side, whetherit's on the management side, where that's on the creative side, we buildhighly efficient machines that do a really, really great job at what they're designedto do, and that's how we build brands and and and that's the ithas to be authentic. That's a part of that's a part of that's apart of the schematic, if you will, for building that machine. Is itauthentic? Because if it's not, you've built something for not two yearbrand, and that's kind of the thing that I've struggled with until I kindof saw it, you know, in person with the I mean an exampleof of, I think, a real brand doing it that I've been involvedwith at least, is a CBD brand, and that industry is, you know, ripe with scams and MLM's and, you know, just and crowd thinkright, right, and just uncertainty about the effectiveness and, you know, pseudoscience and things like that, to the point where, you know,they leaned heavily into the fact that we grow our own himp on our ownfarm. It's USDA certified organic the farm, and so there that was authentic tothem. That was something that, you know, there are very fewfarms in the United States who can genuinely claim you Hasda certified, and soit's differentiator and all that good stuff. And so it's like you have tofind those little nuggets of differentiation for your brand and what's authentic to your brand, what's real for you. It's not just like I don't know that it'sa it's hard to it is branding. I mean, if if you're goingto do it well, it is finding those little nuggets within your company andthey may not exist, and that's kind of where things get scary. Yeah, yeah, it's funny. I'm s interesting as you're telling talking about thisand I'm thinking about so like in the in the Bourbon Industry, for example, there's so many now, MMM, and Bourbon has a very distinct wayin which it's made that otherwise it's not bourbon. Right, right, legallyright. So I'm sinter thinking how difficult it must be, aside from WHOstarted the brand. Okay, they all use the same basic ingredients. MMM, it's like beer. Sorry, sorry, don't want to offend anyone. Icould, but it's been your hate mail to match at. It's thedifficulty, not come the difficulty. In mean part of what makes it authenticare those things, all the things you just mentioned, like with the CBD, about, you know, certified organic farm, not just the planet itself, but the whole process, the whole place in which it's made, growsaction every right and telling an authentic story around those things, not just theelements themselves, but telling a story that's authentic around them. And you lookat like in the liquor industry, and I mentioned Bourbon, that seems tobe how they get traction to by. Okay, it's not just the thingsthemselves, it's the stories behind those moments...

...that build on authentic story. Soit's it has to be more than just the authenticity of the product itself.It's that story about where those things came from and the philosophy that built it. Yeah, that's in your brand. It's in a brand guy lines.I mean it's one of the key things that should be there, the brandstory, so that everybody knows, when they go and they look at thatdocument, it's like, oh, okay, that's that's the origin story. That'show this that's how we got started, this is how this happened, thisis what we stand for. Is Our mission. Blah Blah, BlahBlah. Yeah, and it's all right there. With Bourbon, it's areusually right there on the label, like working the old forester. It wasfirst bottled Bourbon, whether or not it's true or not. Write a lotof historical disagreements. The first bottled Bourbon George Garbon Brown, you know,the founder and the first guy involved. A picture still on the label,the old classic, you know, old photo of him. Yep, andthe only Bourbon before during an after prohibition, which again debate right. But ElijahCraig, HMM, supposedly the first bourbon bottled and it was bottled bya Baptist minister. I was thinking that as he was talking. But theystake a claim as being like the the original Bourbon. MMM, but it'swhen in such this is a whole other podcast. We really should think aboutdoing in a crowded market place of of a certain product sitement like Bourbon,where there's so the crowd is so it's like it's there's so many you allyou see is Brown. You know what I mean? You can't see thelabels, you just see all these brown bottles. How extremely difficult it isto to tell an authentic story that makes you stand out from the rest ofthe crowd. Well, and and on that, because we won't wrap uphere. Is that you know, I've, I think, I believe, though, Baptist Minister Making Bourbon, because I too have been in Deacon meetingsand thought, man, I could use a drink. So anyway with that, if you want to like check out nerd brand how we build brands,see the faces of the team, meet us. You can go nerdbrand agscomat yeah, or maybe just skip over Mitch's face. I don't know,it's up to you. I'm going to scare the kids. Yeah, youscare the kids, John Tell the people. Take and find us on social anywhere, anywhere. Just look for us. WE'RE AD nerdbrand agency pretty much anywhere. Yeah, so consistency. And then, yeah, you want tocheck out this podcast, you can go to gosh, anywhere as well.You can go to apple, itunes, Google, platifyify, Yep, sosounder, Sounder FM, Yep, all of those places, and you canfind it primarily on nerbrand Agencycom podcast. You mentioned Youtube. Yes, thisis on Youtube. So if you're watching this, please click the bell likesubscribe. And apparently there's a thing going on where they got rid of thedislike button, but I can'tnot like us, but I am, I'm going tosay officially I still have the dislike buttons. I kind of feel likeI'm being trold Er pray. Think at the public dislike count. They're notshowing the number publicly. You can still see it on the back end.Oh, as the Creator or whatever. Oh, they're not showing the publicdislike counts anymore for I don't know. That's so inauthentic. That's a andon that note, that's going to conclude this episode of the Nerdbrand of podcast. Thank you for tending in and we ever keeping herd branch draw.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (92)