NerdBrand
NerdBrand

Episode · 2 weeks ago

The New Age of Employer Branding With Guest Merry-Reid Sheffer

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this episode of the NerdBrand podcast, we have Merry-Reid Sheffer from Edge Employment. We talk about the concept of employer branding, The Great Resignation, customizing job roles, and more.

Merry-Reid is quoted: 

"I am a nerd when it comes to employment. Helping people connect with their passion and get paid for it? What could be better! When it comes to making great employment matches, however, job descriptions can get in the way. As we face a "labor shortage" how will employers introduce flexibility into their workplaces? Customized Employment may be the key." So let's talk about that more and how employer branding can help retain and attract talent in your business.

About Merry-Reid Sheffer

Lead Employment Specialist, Merry-Reid Sheffer, earned her Bachelor of Arts in English Literature from the University of Tennessee Knoxville, and a Master of Divinity from Vanderbilt Divinity School. She has worked in retail, food service, childcare, ministry to all ages, and prison abolition. And now, she shares her passion for employment representation and consultation with Edge Employment! Merry-Reid enjoys meeting new people, reading fiction, and spending time with her partner and their dog, Bear.

https://edgeemployment.org/  

Like well, do I put the peanut butteron with my hands like an everything right down to it, jar, if you make upif you wake up early Sunday morning, you're kind of groggy, you really wantto peanut, but I mean yeah just dive, those in fingers in and just put it onthe bread. I guess here we go welcome to their brand podcasteverybody, how everybody doing Nich great on I'm fine and we have a guestit totally, not following script. I know, but you know, I'm Mary. How areyou feeling alive feeling alive? My first podcast well, you know then you're probably notgetting a very good impression, because we are absolutely silly when we gotinto this thing, but that's kind of the vibe of our show anyway. So, but onthis episode, the Podcast we have Mary read help me with your last name. Makesure I get it right chaffer! Thank you from edge employment. She is a leademployment specialist. So you earned a bachelor of Arts and English literaturefrom the University of Tennessee in Knoxville and a master divinity forVandervelt divinity school wow yeah. That's you know, I think I mentallyblocked it out a little bit but yeah. I did some schools yeah yeah yeahfor those may not know like she's, really smart, all right now, don't give themsomething that I can't live up to the Vandy thing kind of stands out so big football game tomorrow. Oh Iwouldn't know I went to Outin. I know I tell peoplethat I bleed orange just in case my grandma ever hears, like I'm afraid,it'll get back to her, but I actually don't keep up with sports at all, soportbail ball. I do that all the time they like they'll, talk like somethingand like we were at. I was at a networking event with somebody and theywere like talking about some games and I was just like the sports ball. Youknow, so I'm pretty sure I'm going to make some t shirts it his sports ballacross it and then that's what we're going to wear when that happens,because nerd gear yeah, even even Jonathan's, got a UL sticker in theback of his car. I mean that says something yeah dinner put it there.Yeah well, nerd brand does have a little bitof a divide because of Jonathan with UF L and you with UF k. We just, I don'tthink it's really a divide because I don't know if Jonathan really has any.I need you to stay on that side of the table. Fine, fine, this podcast just went dark. We might have to make a little wagertoward the end Netra. I don't know when they play the last game of the season. When is that toward the end end of themonth? Okay? Well, I say I'm not sports, but I didjust join a bowling league shout out to the Gutter. Punks awesome, that's agreat name. I own a bowling ball. I've seen one ADENIAN yeah, it's a long story. I almost put shoeson from a bowling alley and then I was like nope. I don't want to put my feetwhere someone else, as has been. I just can't do it. I just don't know what itis about me. I'm just like. No, I'm not wearing the shoes knowing well, thenyou can't play bowling and I'm like I'm cool with that. You can't can't playbowling again: Sports Fall so anyways, you said you're a nerd whenit comes to employment, so helping people connect with their passions andget paid for it. What could be better, I'm actually reading what you sent tous because it made me laugh- and I was like I got to read this like as best Ican in the tone for beamand. It's like what could be better when it comes tomaking great employment matches. However, job descriptions can get inthe way as we face labor shortage, how employers introduce flexibility intotheir workplaces. Customized employment may be the key. So let's talk aboutthat, that was a beautiful reading. By the way, that's exactly how I wrote itin my head: Yes, schools on the customizable: Yes, okay,so for those of you don't know what edge employment does we actuallyrepresent adults with disabilities to...

...find interesting and well paying jobs,and the reason I say it like that is because anyone who you know has been toa grocery store, a movie theater. You know places where they have greeters upfront. You'll notice that people at disabilities often get pigeon hold intothe same few careers over and over again and so edge employment is reallyinvested in helping people break into the industries that they're reallyinterested in those very highly valued industries, using the skills that aremost highly valued in the workplace. So, instead of thinking lois calmdenominator, what is the easiest thing that anybody could do in this businessone at a time? What is something that this person could do really well intheir area of interest and then making those matches one at the time. So a lotof people that are doing the same work use a model called supported employmentwhere you're supporting someone to fill an existing role within a business.What we do we do that as well, but something else that we offer, which iskind of an added value service, is customized employment, which is kind ofthe new way of representing folks. And it's basically looking at what are theoperational needs of a business? What are the most highly valued skills ofthe job candidate with the disability and then making those match and ahighly customized way, so, whether you're looking for ten hours a week orforty hours a week, ten dollars an hour or fifteen dollars an hour? We arecustomizing that every step of the way yeah, that's a that's a desperatelyneeded thing. I think so. I think you know. I say this all the time customersimplement doesn't just benefit job candidates with disabilities. It reallycan benefit any job candidate, any existing employees when you're, whenyou're customizing, what someone does they're able to take more ownershipover that specific work and- and I think it's easier for people managingpeople too and saying every time we check in we're not checking it abouttwenty different things, we're checking in about the top five that you know,are your responsibilities and you can really take ownership and leadership ofand do well instead of doing halfway. Yeah I mean John, and I we've had conversationslike if we go out, we try to find people like. I try to he's got arunning Italian list of things that he does on daily. First Standard operatingprocedure like a so if we go out and next year and bring somebody in theseare the things he needs that that person needs to do that way. We're notfocused on a job title and what that expected title is in some randomizedrequest or descript job description. You know we actually have this role.This is what we need. Are you interested in this is the rat and allthat so to me, that just seems to make sense. solutely. Yes, what's that, likeJohn, Oh, it's fun, it's fun! I mean I don't. I have limited experience. Iguess I mean I've worked at a couple, different agencies and you naturallyyou know there are things that you can do as somebody who touches a bunch ofdifferent projects and sits in on different types of meetings, and thingslike that. You, you know when it comes to righting a quick line of copy.Sometimes it just makes sense for you to do it. You know you you're kind ofthe last touch point of review before something goes to the client, so yougot to get in this mode where, like your Qa, you're you're, the finaltester and if something goes wrong, it's on you, so you kind of justnaturally get all the stuff. You know on your plate, but kind of that last line of defense. Youare and realistically you're the person who has to deal with the fall out. Ifsomething does go wrong, not that the rest of the team doesn'tyou know ultimately get the get the brunt of it, but you're the person whogets the phone call you're the person who gets the Oh, I'm the first thingit's the brunt of his like I got yelled at and then I got to go to one of youall go like John got yelled at now. I Got Yell Dad and John, I'm afraid, John.Fortunately it doesn't happen, it really doesn't have. I think everybodykind of has pride in their work and you know we've gone through our kind ofgrowing things already, so it doesn't. It happens. Maybe once a year: Well,it's really inevitable yeah I mean, but thus is probably I mean if there wereany bump it's because of you misspelled something wately, but because we'resmall and we all wear several hats yeah,...

...you know it. I tend to think- and thisgoes to like when you talk about working toward people's strength, the more you ask of a person as far asresponsibilities, you really watering down the amount of attention they'reable to give to each one of those responsibilities. I think yeah. So inour case things like that, if it happens which we've been we kind ofchick each other. So we've been very fortunate in that respect, but yeah Imean it's. I just think it's a a natural outgrowth of not having enoughpeople handling the amount of responsibilities that have to beattended to is you you can't give as much attentionto each of those things so something's got to give Oh yeah well on what Iliked. What I heard, but with what you weresaying, John Aton in, is your writing down what you are actually doing rightright and so you in the alls business it sounds like you have the space tokind of decide what is a priority, what needs to be done first and thenactually writing down what that looks like when so often the people that arewriting job descriptions aren't the ones doing the job yeah. I think theyare. I think that's where a tone of the trouble comes in is like you know. Thatis their job. You know and it kind of gets delegated to them, but they're notclose enough to the work to really know the day to day tasks and for whatever reason they don't seem tosit down with the people, doing the task to get those things out of them,or I don't know what I'm pretty sure there's somewhere, there's a manualthat they all get. They all have to hear to doping on the stake thatthey're in or whatever so policy. So they turn to that page and goes themarketers were, and it's probably up been updated since nineteen seven bechecking coxes yeah and then you so I don't completely like you know, blame them in a way because they kindof have to stick to policy's policy. You know and there's legalramifications for stepping outside of that, but at the same time, when theyread that description that was written thirty four yearss ago, like we allknow that a lot of things didn't exist in our world of advertising thirtyforty years ago, so you know you know they're woefully outdated. I'm sure ifthat even exists right- and I would you know, I would count HR and those folksthat are probably doing things are outside of their job and maybe have badjob descriptions to and yeah I mean, especially if you're talking about you know if it's a long standingcompany organization, they could have been doing the same position twentyyears ago and maybe that's what it did look like twenty years ago. But youknow you got to reevaluate these things constantly yeah for businesses. Thereare codes that determine like your sector like you're or you worse. Ifyou're an advertising, then it's code, I don't know it's weird governments dothis stuff, so we don't. I don't know what it is. I look at advertising andgo. Oh that's the code within that they have to be using something in R to kindof look at that and judge off of that job descriptions. There has to besomething out there, I'm not in Ajar. Obviously, so I'm betting that, like to your point when you're sayingand that's probably what's out of date and they've got to like that, needs tobe reassessed and it's not as simple as individual companies fixing it there'slegislation that might have to come into plum regulations, yeah, absolutelyyeah yeah, I'm O. I feel that moving on to the next part here John'snotes, now John did a lot of investigation on this, like he sent meall this stuff. So, John, I'm going to let you talk about this, because it'sreally good talking points about the cost like there's, like those don'tknow, there's a cost for hiring before the tire before the persons hired,there's a cost, for you know, obviously retaining them and then there's a costif they leave so John I'll. Let you take it well. Thank you. You Ere theintroduction yep well after what I've just said for the last five minutes andeverything I'm like. Oh well, let's clean this up, I mean, I think, the the overall pointbeing you know, I think everybody kind...

...of understands if you recruit or ly ifyou hire poorly and you have high turn over there's a high cost. To that Imean there's no point in trading somebody for a year to kind of get toproficiency in a certain role and then they leave yeah. That's going to costyou a good amount of money. I think a most most employers, hopefully kind of,have either lived that or just it's a given, but I've never seen. You knowthe types of numbers and the real statistics around that. So one is, youknow when, when top candidates want to work for you, you're recruiting costsdrop by like forty three percent, which is thousands of dollars, you know yeahright with with a recruiting agency. You know there's this. This statisticthat fifty percent of workers, so they wouldn't work for a company with a badreputation, even with a big increase in compensation. So we know that, like just throwing a bunch of money atsomebody is r or your recruitment cycle is not going to fix your problem. So Ithink that the other angle of this, this episode is employer branding andwhat does that look like and we talk about it from you know the perspective of it. It'sjust like going after customers. You have to have a mission. You got to have areason to exist. You got to be able to communicate. Why? Why are you as anemployer or somebody worth working for, and then you got to show that from anexecutional standpoint, which is part of the employee that perspective ploysbuying, I mean in order to keep your brand sound and solid and to have aconsistent projection of that brand to the outsideworld. The people that are in the company working on that brand doing the work ofthe brand have to be bought in to some degree or another. I mean going to your point about peoplenot wanting to work for a coming as bad reputation. Well I mean how much ofthemselves can they give to the work, creating a high quality work product if deep down think this place is a dumpright, O, there's that, and I think in this day and age, you know the digitalage and the way people are kind of trying to build their personalbrands and their personal reputation having a bad employer. You know orcoming from a bad employer, set you up for difficulties, finding your nextrole or it impacts your reputation. You know, potentially, especially if you'rein some kind of management or leadership row at a company that thengets a or has a bad reputation publicly yeah, that's going to hinder your youknow, not just you personally, pursuing your passions or dreams or whatever,but it's actually going to hurt your career prospect, so I think that stuffbeing so public. Now you resume your linked in profile, your you know yoursocial media profiles and things like that. That being so, public makespeople a lot more sensitive to who they, you know, what are they willing to giveup to just to have a job yeah I since and it's an entire movement nation ladthat you know a labor and employers have had this relationship that isbased upon economics and now it's becoming based upon mental health andemotions, and you know when starting the genesis in Er brand. Itwas like you know, we're going to go operate off this philosophy, and Iremember when we first started and John you had like you were kind of likebecause you're John's a very tactical. Obviously you can you just heardstatistical type thinker so when he heard why how what and we got to thehowl he's like all right procedures and I'm like not? No, not really. That's not what that means, even thoughit says how I know it's probably a bad term, but it's like the. How is thebelief about the why you know so you know we exist because we love helpingpeople better, communicate their passions and their why they exist andalso why you should be plying from them their product or service the. How isbecause we believe everything is an ad, so therefore we build websites we dobranding. We do a bunch of the what we...

...call a what which you can pretty muchget from anywhere, but we can do it in house. You know, so that's our entire philosophy. Now,nowhere in there is a procedure or really a process, but there can. Is Youknow, because when you get down to it and you're dealing with people andyou're dealing with this is their start up. This is their business. This iswhere they're at. Why are you doing it? We have to hear it because we'reactually fashioning a story that will turn into and they added some pointbecause everything's, an ad you know Mitch, is going to look at you and golike yeah, but tell me this tell me that and tell me this well, those arebecause those are the things that make it's like you're talking about. Youknow the what people can get what's anywhere, but what makes people decide to buy thethat? What from you versus the other person is the how and the why yeah,because the wy informs the how yeah, so somebody else is like for you guys,like somebody else. Does your website well? Well, all right cool, that's notwhere we hang our hat. You know I mean what does it say on the website? What'sthe imagery on the website? Do those things convey I've been telling peoplelately like even with imagery it's like do? Do you have a picture on yourwebsite with the same four people that everybody uses looking at down on a des?You know Google has caught that now and realizes that name that company thosepeople don't work there and it's starting to be come a problem on thesearch result. So that's another podcast, but it's like to conveythrough words and that's the message to convey through imaging. That's that'salso a part of your identity and message. So that's what's changing inhow businesses need to think about their business, but that's also got totranslate to employment, because if I believe what you believe, I will wilfully go and work for you andthe money. Obviously. Is there because it will support me financially, but Ireally believe in this mission in what you're doing and why you're doing itman. Ideally, those are the people you want when people againts like I saidthat are bought in, they have a they want to share that common journey andthey want to go to the same place that everybody else in the company or thefounder of the company who pretty much ere founders, whatever the case thatestablish that why they do what they do, it's just going to make the companymore successful and is going to present a more consistent image to the world at large, which isideal the ideal that everybody strives for Yeah Yeah Yeah. So it's veryespecially if you've been listening to this podcast specially today show you know you kind of get like whatwe're like you know. So I've had we've had I e, Idon't know about you, John, but I've had people in our own orgust be likeyeah. I love it here like they know exactly what they're doing. They know whether it's like day to dayto kind of what to expect, but they also know they have the flexibility todo like you know our web designer she's, like I can make some t shirts and somenurter m, like cool, just make sure you tell Mitch because he's a createdirector at just communicate. Just let me know, I know he likes Coffee Cups, we're back to that again, but I do I mean, based on what you guyssay, you're saying I mean with the market being so competitiveand there's just so many options and with everything being an ad, onlyincreasing our options for things. Employees and consumers are now lookingbeyond like what am I making and what is the product right that it is. How isthis company invested in me? How? How are they invested in my community, andit really does have to be like more than lip service right, yeah? So manypeople right now. You know I'll get a fosse message, because their website will say that you knowdiversity, equity and inclusion are top priority for their business. But then Ireach out to a diversity recruiter in name right and and no one ever respondsright. So it's like. I wonder if it is your top priority, ifyou're going to say that t those things...

...are your values and you have to back itup o. It is one of the things that I'm seeing and a lot of the companies thatdon't have a statement about D and I on their website or on their social mediasanywhere. Are the ones see that seem to be most interested in the idea of acustomized match so yeah? I think there is there. Is Goddisconnect there and what people you know are advertising their values andwhat they really are, but bird versus what they think. People want to hearand just kind of saying, yeah things to check off a litter. Well, it s it s.You know we talked about it in a lot and, as I mean in this case, and wekind of said it early on that, your brand message doesn't just extend asfar as what you're telling the consumers it's what you're saying toyour employees and what you're saying to perspective employers or employee aperspective employes to make sure that everything, you're saying and doing isconsistent. It's true, it's mean Gonta, say this word and we're going to talkabout. I think in the coming pocket, authentic. Okay, I mean it gets throwna out around a lot today, but you've got a you can't just say it. You haveto be doing it and you have to be doing it in a way. That's organic, that itdoesn't look forced or not, doesn't. Look like you're just checking a boxyeah you en one of the believe in your brand and extends from the outside onthe shelf. All the way inside of the people that are doing and helpingfacilitate whatever your servicer product is yeah right, John. You looklike you had like you're just sitting on a seat for a point. Think if you're,if you're a business or a company that has to promote this idea that you'reyou have a diverse and inclusive work force, you shouldn't have to say that likeShinobi but everybody, the thing is: Everybody is now that yeah. Well, it'slike nerd brand. If you look at us, if you go to our about Pagina look at whowe have and who's on, Staalin your like, okay, okay, it just worked out that way.I didn't purposely plan that, but it should be given that it was, I think,if you're a good employer and a good person, it's naturally going to happenlike they knew they know their stuff. They know their stuff, and that wasparamount for me, because John- and I know that if you do crappy work, youdon't get more work, they know their stuff from so well. No, when you work-and you know a company like yours, which isflexible and interested in the skills that are being brought to the table andwhat people need in order to be successful, like you're working onthose problems together and so much of the time. I think that you knowdiversity. Inclusion isn't as important as the belonging aspect. I've heardthis in a lot of D and I like panels and discussions and things where youknow marginalized employees are the ones giving voice to what they want tosee in a workplace, and so often it's you know, bringing thepeople in who kind of check those diversity boxes, but not hearing whatthey have to say, not changing what you're doing at all. You know. I thinkthat there are those people. Yes, I think there are those people that aresaying. This is how we could change the job description to be more fitting towhat I do, but if a company is so protective overwhat they have written down already then you're not there is not that senseof belonging and- and someone has to have a seat at the table in order to beadding. You know their diverse experience and perspective to thatcompany as well. So if you're not listening, that's the point yeah rightright. Well, I think it's you know it's top down. All of that is top down, andyou know. Unfortunately, I think leadership at the highest highestlevels has not really gotten it's gotten more diverse. I guess somethingabout the statistics, but we still have a big, a big gap in diversity andinclusion at the leadership level. Yes, that is, I mean, that's such a goodpoint too, because you know a lot of times I'll go tothese networking events, where I'm put in contact with the top person right,the president, the CEO, the Strategic Guide and a lot of times, they'resaying yes, we want to do that. We want to do customers, employment. Let me putyou in contact with our HR recruitment staff right well, the messaging to themis not coming through, because when I...

...get to that point, the people areusually saying we can't change a job description. We can't customize a jobdescription and it's like well, your president said you could and so yeah. Idon't blame the recruitment folks, nes HR folks, like obviously they're doingwhat they were hired to do, which you know the messaging to them, is protectat all cost. Don't change at all costs, like youknow, keep it as close to what we initially set out for as possible, butat the same time, you're hearing different messaging from the top, andso it's I think it's kind of everyone saying like we know what diversity is.We don't know how to incorporate it, so we're going to keep handing it off tosomeone else and hope that they do it. I at there's a certain degree of fear.Oh my Gosh! Yes, like I don't I don't feel like. I have the authority to maketo initiate this kind of change or make these kind of adjustments to our to ourapproach of stuff. But it's somebody up heresaying yes, but somebody down here in the Middlee, which is that's where mostof the people work in a corporations anyways in the in the middle of like Idon't feel like. I have the authority to where the notes like he said. Yeahit's execution is right. Okay! Well right! I mean: Where do I go in lovely?But how do I do? Where do I go to get it done? Who Do I talk to Yeah Yeah?I've experienced that as well, because I get into organizations and thenthey're like what we're going to hire you for this job, and it's happened tome. Mitch had a front row seat at it and it was like wait. You know how todo this and this and this and this and a yeah and then they're like okay. Canyou take a look at that? I'm like sure, and then I do it and then, of course,I'm the type of person that will do a thing and then, when you smack my hand,that's when I'll quit so, but there's a lot of people outthere. They don't they don't work that way. Well, it's kind of funny and a lotof this goes to things like job descriptions and staying within a typeframework of responsibilities and it's probably a different mechanism with asmaller company than is like a larger corporation, where you really have tomake sure that everybody is kind of marching in in step because there's somany moving parts, but I mean I'm kind of like Jason, an that I interpresposition. It was a situation where I had the flexibility like basically takeas much rope as I wanted until somebody pulled back and said. Okay, you'vepulled enough yeah, but you don't know when that's going to happen right, Idon't need whip lash, you know so well, yeah yeah and that's that's. Thedownside is like well, you kind of need some guard rails to say this is yourlane is wide, but you have to stay within these areas and in some waysthat protect the organization. It keeps you from trying to exercise, maybeskills. Maybe you think you have them that are unproven. You know what I mean.It also is a great example about why why you should have brand guidelines orsomething is called brand standards, because it gives everybody that's goingto put their hands on that marketing agency, the social media manager, thevideo production company like Oh, maybe we don't put a drop shadow on the logoat Pickanin, but it's just one of those things youknow you have to have that. So everybody kind of knows what'sacceptable. WHAT'S: Okay! Well, that consistency extends through. It shouldextend. Not If that same mentality should extend throughout the the youknow, the entire company, the entire brand.Hopefully you were listing the people who use them. I'm saying the CEO shouldhopefully have you know the utmost respect for those Brad Standards andyeah and not ask for silly things yeah, which, which is not uncommon, no yeah.No, I mean I type regardless. You know, I'm a web developer by trade and I'mnot probably going to quit so I'll do things and pass that back and forthwith Laura and then you know, gets in John's hands after it goes throughMitches for creative validation, everything and to make sure it's onbrand, and if I write copy John gets it and looks at it and goes you know,that's a good thought, but maybe we write it this way. You know because ourtone, you know where we don't want to deviate from a tonal shift, which hascome up a lot in some of the stuff that...

I've been doing and talking with a willI past couple weeks. People are starting to become more aware that howyou say it and how you look the both equally important. It's probably harder I mean, is onething you were telling about: is that that same philosophy, extending beyondmarketing but throughout the company? As far as maintaining that you want tocreate an atmosphere that reflects the brand and it's and it's real and it'sauthentic and it's it's organic. It's problem again: it's a function oflarge corporations versus smaller businesses. It's a harder lift, the bigger of the boat, the long righttime, O take exactly exactly and the more risky run of people wanting to go.You know kind of go rogue yeah! I have a great idea. It's counter everythingwe're doing from a branding and marketing standpoint, but I'm going togo that way, because I think it's cool you gotta tect yourself from that toit's so incredibly easy to be critical as well. It's like you know, and we aretrying to grow a small company to be a slightly larger company and it'sexceptionally difficult just to get one person fit into the right role to allowyou to take that next step up. It's just unfathomable to me that that somecompanies have three sand employees or fifty sand employees and they're intwelve different countries. And how do you maintain that culture in a way thatallows you to accomplish all these things that were we're talking about?Are the right way to do things yeah and nothing's on fire? For Anybody? That'sin the situation. It's not, you know, lost cause. Everything can be fixed andadjusted, because every company has expansion and contraction. We all hitplateaus and we all have to figure out how to get beyond them. It's just anatural flow of things, but to what you bring to the table, Barry in and itaddresses like if you can start at the base and start customizing more whoyou're bringing in to do what. If you know what they do or what you need, itmakes that goal of growing and that growth actually more obtainable, andyou don't run into like. Oh I got too much to do. I can't meet a causecapacity or you can't do it, because that's not what we do or you know I Iwhat's more intelligent. I well I mean you know, I think when I started thiswork and I think most people's assumption with the work is that it'sthese super huge employers that you know could or should be hiring thepulse that we're representing when so often it is not. The case likethe success stories tend to lie in the MOM and pop businesses in the smallerbusiness is where the person at the top is still connected to the work that'sgoing on Data Bay, and so they do have that kind of they have the insight tosay this is what we need, and they also have the power to say and we're goingto fill that mean with this person we're so often like when we're talkingabout the larger core crop corporations. I think the buck is just getting. Youknow: dropped somewhere. You know like ammunicion yeah. Well, every it's kindof goes back to what we said about people are afraid. What can I do what'sacceptable and you brought it up earlier about like will pass this along?Maybe they'll get it right, because I don't really know- and it's like well,let's all just like it's a hard conversation, but let's all sit andhave it. You know for sure, and- and you think that I guess the way thatwe're doing it would be like a super low pressure thing right. We only makeone match at a time which I mean when you're talking abouthuge businesses. It's like you're not going to make her break. You know whatyou're doing by hiring one customers employee, but I do think that you knowamidst the great resignation I will call it. You know people are starting to wonder.Is One move going to have to change the way that I do everything you know if we let one person kind ofof have this situation that works for them? Well then, we're going to have tomake it. You know sure everyone that works for us, it's going to have tohave the right situation for them, which sounds scary, but when we'retalking about how much you lose when you lose an employee starts to make alittle bit of sense. Yeah statistics yeah. The statistics said John Found. II was like wow like these are percentages that I wish I had chanceson winning a lottery ticket.

You know, but then I are notpercentages that I want to have scared like. If I look at our books at the endof the month and go like Oh, it is lost forty three percent there because Ididn't have the right fit or something I mean o, replace somebody yeah. I meannow that part should be scary enough, but it's like you can still have theyou still have the time to take action. I mean we're seeing in our cultureright now everything changed with that. So it's kind of the tin. It's a longtime overdue. I mean not like this just happened overnight. The reason you knowit's Hap, it's been. I think the the mentality has been that you can haveturn over. You can find another employee, there's going to be anotherskilled person on the other side and we're seeing that that's kind of like atwenty year problem. That's been ignored and yeah from the top brains inthe world and now they're like Oh crap. Now we do have to change everythingabout the way we you know we recruit at. We track talent, and it's not even forme, it's not as much about the fear I mean the costs are obviously you knowsignificant, but it's more about you want to achieve your goals. Youwant to hit that revenue gold. Do you want to whatever launch that that newproduct service, whatever it may be, you have to have the right people atthe table? It's the only the only way to accomplish it, no amount oftechnology or marketing and advertising or whatever is gonna. You know create that potential more than havingthe right people, the right talent and retaining them and having their by into get to that goal, and I think that's to me that's kind of the philosophy iswhere I'm a new employer. You I feel like you, you know this is your secondRodeo third yeah, I'm trying to forget the first one, but keep going I'm just I'm trying to find the rightmentality to approach all this with, and you know I stumbled on this onewhere nothing else matters except having the right people on the bus, andthen you steer the bus and that's kind of the mentality that I've been takingfor like the last six months and that's what really motivated me to startwriting down processes start. You know I've got a a folder in my apple. Youknow my iphone notes at that is just ner brand processes of things that I doand as I get time, I wish I could make it more of a priority. But, as I gettime I go through and I'd write down one process for that. Well, HERE'S THEGO! Here's the golden trick to processes, you know until you startdoing them and analyzing them and observing, especially when you'redealing with people, because people are individuals you're. You can't develop aprocess out in the Vaccam when John and I start first started working together.That was the first thing you wanted one process and I'm like. Well, I don'tknow how you and met are going a job together. So give me a few most to seethis as I like process it. We all. I mean we all want rules and we we allwant to know. Okay, what are the teat to get from point a to point B, Yeahbecause Laura and I we've done web for decades. So when I put her in a room-and I was talking- she was like Yep one to treat done, it was pretty easy tocome up with, because we just like we're older that and that's how we'redog that's at web works, yeah yeah, it has been well. It's always been thesame in my on the creative side too, there's always a set of process as yougo through to get the from the the creation to the to the to the finalproduct. There's always been, there's always been state, so John's process ishe's working on for those listening or watching is talking about your fromabout account management, but all stop about marking like how to handle theaccount, but also how to do the execution parts for from a tacticalperspective. What are you doing day today? In that way, you know like ourbranding. We do have a branding process, believe it or not. Now it's continuedto evolve, as we have had to change and pivot for the market, for how peopleare responding, but we have it. You know and walking people through it.I've noticed after talking about it for the last month and a half early thatmakes sense so yeah you have to develop that, buttake some time it just take. I think it's a mindset thing, that's kind ofwhat my point was: it's not just going to. You know US going to wake up onemorning and suddenly feel like writing down your process is right. It's notfun. No, it's actually pretty grilling and it's like a holy crap that havelike fifteen steps to do this, one thing, but that's what that next higheris going to need yeah. They need...

...something to refer to, so that theydon't have to think yeah. So they move faster. They do the right things youget to where you're going more quickly and more efficiently, but if there'snothing more frustrating than being in a job thinking. You know what you'resupposed to do, but you need somebody to kind of tell you and you've gotnothing yeah. So Mary, are we doing it right over her just feigning like I'm soexcited? Because so I mean only me right if someone isreally aner about employment, it is me, but year talking about processes andthat's something that we really emphasize right. Is that so muchwe chalk up to common sense, which is not really a thing it's subjective right like that is aperson. What we don't realize is that we all learned what we're doingsomewhere and so much of that is the problem when we look at employingpeople with disabilities as that, it's almost a self fulfilling prophecy. It'slike. If you don't know it, then you know it's not something we canteach you that's. You know so part of the work that we're doing isyou know I'm making in the initial contact with an employer going intelling them about customize employment and then a specific person that we havein mind for them because, like I said it is one at a time and if they'reinterested the next thing we do is a needs benefits analysis, so we'recoming in we're looking at everything, that's going on right and and we're recording those things toWHO's doing this, this task at what time? How frequently is that happeningeach day, each week, just kind of all the things right andthen once we see a few of the operational areas that would overlockwith the skills of a job candidate, we go in and watch those steps in depth right solike I might sit behind someone doing web development or something for fourhours and literally just watch the steps that they're doing and then it'sbasically the work of a process engineer from there. Where I'm writing.I literally write down the steps and all the employment specialists do writedown the steps of each task that we have identified for the person we'rerepresenting, so that there's no confusion over what someone supposed tobe doing every day. Yeah it that's what I wanted to do with John, but then, assoon as I mentioned, that I kind of felt this well and then, of course, hedoes work in his attic and there's only like a foot behind him in the walls Idon't fit in the foot area. That's there there's not enough room than Idid, but there's so many more steps than you would possibly even imagine oryou're figuring this out getting into it. But you know that that assignment,I don't know if you all did but everyone I knowed it in middle school,the peanut butter and Jelly making sandwich right like where you're you're,making a sandwich- and you have to you- can't do something if it's not writtendown, and so I pick up the knife isn't on the list, then it's not somethingyou do and then it's like well do I put the peanut butter on with my hands likeeverything right down to I e Jar. If you make up, if you wake up earlySunday morning, you're kind of groggy and you really want to peanut butt- Imean yeah just dive, those in fingers in and just put it on the bread. Iguess here we go here. We go again, you know well we're going to get to t we'regetting to the get to the in here to wrap up. But but yes, yes, exactly no, I love aprocess and I think that that that thinking about that specifically couldgo in a lot of ways right. If we're thinking about do job descriptions needto be shorter and reflect specifically what someone is doing, send someone towrite the steps down and make not just the job, description and clear, but theactual steps of the task that someone is expected to do. You know, most of the time that thedisconnect is with the expectations- and you know, neurotypical people or nondisabled people often use observation as an extra tool and thinking about Ohsomeone's, not saying this is what they want me to do. But in watching them I'mgoing to do it the same way they did yeah and- and so we kind of have this-you know extra tool, sometimes that maybe job cundites with to say withdisabilities may not, and so our job is...

...not to do the training or the onboarding ourselves, but to come in and make sure that communication etudebetween two very different parties is clear and that everyone knows what isexpected of them. Going into the roll exactly I just because everybody wantsto know in the final anally when they are looking for a job applying for ajob. I need to know what's expected of me, because I want to succeed yeah, butI can only succeed and you can only be successful organization if I'm meeting finite objectives yeah,I never been anybody like chills up for a job be like, like you know what I'mgoing to do, a terrible job see if I can get fired by noon. I don't knowthey've been tin, yeah. Well, you know. But Anyway we love having you on. You know. It's been pretty, I hopeeducational ferry by, but it has been for us as well, and you know I want to give you kind ofa little bit tell people where to find you and tell about the website and allthat Tu yeah. So so we have all of our social medias up and launched sofacebook instagram twitter, Lindon edge employment, and then we also areworking on launching a website here in the next few weeks at edge employment,DOT ORG. I will just put a little plug in there. All of our services are freeto job candidates and employers. So you know this isn't something I'm sellingnecessarily. We need these stories to continue doing the work and, and socollecting. These stories is my ad right for this. Is this works, so thethe the website will be a place where those stories are housed and people cancome and see a real life example of what customers employment looks like ina small or large business. W awesome awesome well if you've enjoyed thispodcast. Please like subscribe, Click the Bell: If you're watching this onYoutube, we want a Vanite, you are we really do we're getting there we'regetting there. We got some people coming in and going like subscribe. Youknow, I don't know who some of them are, but thank you but anyways yeah! You goto nerve brand agency COM s podcast, to find the latest episode of this. Youcan also check us out all over the social media universe, John, a nerdbrand agency YEP. So we want to thank everybody for listening and tuning andremember keeping her brand on a.

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