NerdBrand
NerdBrand

Episode · 8 months ago

Startup Story Series #1 - Characteristics of an Entrepreneur - with Scott Smith from Gracie Jiu-Jitsu of Kentucky

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Scott is a passionate entrepreneur who changed vocations from sales in the automotive industry to operating Jiu-Jitsu schools. He's now a black belt, and has two schools in two cities with over 100 students. Scott continues to show the characteristics of a self-starter; that is, to practice the discipline needed to succeed. Being an entrepreneur is hard. As hard as it is to spell it…seriously, try without autocorrect. Anyways, on this episode of the NerdBrand Podcast, we’re discussing the characteristics of being an entrepreneur vs. being just an “idea” person. Scott has a great story of going from corporate sales to being a successful business owner -- starting with a mere $385. Visit Scott at: https://www.graciekentucky.com/ or online at - https://www.facebook.com/graciekentucky --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nerdbrand/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nerdbrand/support

Hi everybody. I'm Jason Davis ofthe nerve brand podcast, the branding and marketing from a nerds point of view, where we talk about well, branding and marketing. So we do thison Anchor Dot FM. Anchored is the easiest way to make a podcast.Let me explain. It's free. There's creation tools that allow you to recordand edit your podcast rot from your phone a computer, and get will distributeyour podcast for you. So can me her on spotify, apple podcasting anymore. You make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything youneed to make a podcast in one place. So download the anchor APP or goto Anchor Dot FM to get started. And then I see your Batman inthe bike. I have got a fullblown, one hundred percent pures dayBatman outfit that was made by Zach Schuler, who does movie stuff. I paidabout a grant for the suit. I got my hit, my headpiece come out of Canada, my cap come out of the England and myhe built my entire chest piece. I mean when I'll roll in. Ifyou if you get on my facebook, click on my view picture and you'llsee me walking in. It was the first time I put the uniform oneand I did a birthday party for a five year old and I said yeah, I said, I'll do that, that's cool. Yeah, I goout and suit up. The guy that was helped me, the next ranger, he's Butt Zip me up and I'm like, Dude, hang on,loosen it up. I came walking around the corner of the parents, didthat turn. They went, there's job. I mean I opened the door,every kid went, they mobbed me. Well with that, I'll just goahead and officially open the show now. So welcome to the nerve brand podcast. Everybody were on the show with Scott Smith, who is actually theReal Batman. Will have a link. As it turns out, I dosay that the kids. Michael Keaton, let me take it. You wantto fight. You listen. You know the battle bill is two streets over. True Story. The Michael Keaton Batmobile's part. Two streets over in agarage. Dead. Seriously, don't come with you. Where do you?ECTUALLY, coming down blank and Baker Road, I went, Oh, there's MichaelKeaton's Batmobile. Oh Wow, yeah, I need to get out more now. I know that the comedian, he's a the Van Triloquist, JeffDune them. He's actually got one of them and of course I don't knowis Jay Leno, but Jay lenos got the the Tumbler. He's got thatwill work. That the newest one. Yeah, the one from the stresspherNolan. Yeah, they were in that. It's actually on youtube where the Jay'sgarage episode where they're in it and driving it. Oh my God,it's so noisy you can even hear it like through the mics as they're talkingand it's like the clunkiest thing. Right and he said, but the guythat was with him was like, well, this is the one they drove withand then there's another one they jumped and there's all these things. Soit's actually when you see it kind of going around jumping across stuff, that'sactually happening. That's not CGI. That's crazy. We'll be here. Amazing. Yeah, so, anyways, I'll introduce you, Scott. We I'mreally digging the COMBA. We could talk, but also listeners out there. Scott, tell him who you are, what you do, and tell abouttell about your business. Tell me you and give us a little brief snippetof your story, because you started out with three hundred and eighty five dollars. Yes, I'm my name is Scott Smith. I am the owner ofGrac Jiu Jitsu of Kentucky. We're in Jaytown where the JTEN location we wenow are set on three locations. I was a corporate guy for thirty twoyears. Interesting story how that all got transformed over, I did this asa side hustle and he you know, you are correct. I took threehundred eighty five dollars and I started this in two thousand and seven, rightwhen the great recession hit started to hit, and then I just kept rolling themoney and now this is what I do for a living and I neverborrowed a diamond money and I've never pulled a dime out of my savings account. Ever. I just kept rolling the money and this is what I dofor a living now and we're hitting the second and I'm partners in a thirdlocation as well. So yeah, we're just continuing to grow. We havetow and I know you put up to you. We have well over twohundred fifty students. I think you you had marked a hundred, but we'rewell over two hundred and fifty now. Since colds kind of settled back down. People are coming in and it's continuing to grow more and more. It'sSNIPPINGTO three hundred mark. Wow, yeah, I mean that's you know, theone thing like that I think they we're going to hear a lot ofcoming up is businesses and entrepreneurs that have made it through the pandemic, becauseit's not a great time to start a business. And we even have thatstory. I mean we started officially in April of two thousand and twenty,right when everything shut down. I mean John and I were already starting toformulate around February and then we got all the official, you know, paperworkdone at the end of February. So a lot of the reasons we didn'ttake any money because we actually didn't qualify.

We missed it by like five businessdays. If we hit like done it earlier, we would have beenmade. We would have been a proud we got to prove for EDL butwe didn't take that. I was like, I don't understand how you're supposed topay this back and track all that. And Two thousand and twenty was alreadya tax nightmare for our CPA. So I didn't want to make itworse and then you know. But the PPP stuff, we never got thatbecause I think the date was like February fifteen and we were officially on thepaper for the twenty seven or something and just missed. It's like beast itby that much. Well, you are so close. The PPP helped.It just took care of pay where everybody thought if you got the PPP money, it's salvage you it. Did Not know know any any small business ownerknows that that that if you don't save like you know. I I don'tknow where I got this overwhelming feeling. I wish I could tell you thatI knew the pandemic was coming, but I did not at all. ButI in two thousand and nineteen. I just got this overwhelming feeling, andyou can my wife can back this up. I kept saying, Hey, whenyou save money, Hey, you need to put money back. Whateverwe she's we got some, put it into savings, I said. Iwe just need to save, save, safe, save. So we startedstock pound a bunch of money like a like a bunch of squirrels getting readyfor winter, and we weren't going anywhere buying anything, and I honestly cannottell you why I was so compelled and feed overwhelm to do that. Ijust did. And I had enough money saved where our business, the GracieJutsu Kentucky, could have everyone could have walked out the door and I wouldhave been able to pay myself and pay every bill for six months. Yeah, so we had enough money sitting there. And you know, when it allhappened, you're just likes to shock, because I closed down a week aheadof time. So when all this was happening, I said I'm aleader in the community as far as in Jiu Jitsu and martial arts, andI said I've got to do the right thing. I said there's a pandemic, there's you know, people are getting sick, we need to shut down. So I had people hitting me up. Thank you, thank you, thankyou, thank you. You're awesome. You know, way to take alead on this. Well, low and behold, it kept you shutdown for ever and it just kept going and, you know, and tryingto get a grasp and a hold of what's going on. So it wasvery, very challenging time and by the end of the year in two thousandand twenty, it got to where I couldn't pay my bills. Yeah,it was. People were bell and they're like look, man, once theydid that three weeks shut down the last time. They said we're out,and I'm like freaking out and you know, we made some adjustments and kept somepeople and we were able to pay for our bills at the end ofthe months, with the very end of the month. We hustled and youknow, we got it done and it was the most it was the hardestat worked every bit in five, five or six years. I'm I washustling, I was in here doing videos, I was in here doing zoom classes. I mean we were just I was living in the gym just tryingto keep things going and it was tough. Yeah, yeah, and that's that'ssort of the thing. Like with the everything that went on and still, in some places going on, it's hard to figure out ways to kindof keep going when you know you you can't like have a hundred percent beopened. Of course you know now it was really funny. We went outlast night. We're standing outside. Were like do we wear masks? Dowe not? Do we were because all of us are vaccinated, and sowe're like yeah, but all it takes is that one, you know whatthey say, get one Kreen to like what are you doing? Not Nice, and it's like it's fine, I'm vaccinated. Prove it. Well,you know, I can print off that card. It you know, staples, but whatever. It's like kind of like how do you really? Sowe're all three of us are like do we know? Do we do?We is we'd put it on and walked in. We put it on outside, walked in the door and looked around and nobody else. Everyone's like,okay, yeah, and then yeah, and then you look at all thestaff at the place that we were eating at and they were like they werewearing them. So we're like maybe, no, it's just that big gameof do you, do you not? I wear them walking, Hey,do we have to have this? If they say yes, I've got iton. Yeah, but when I'm like all think goodness and I rip itoff. You know. So I just did that. I when got myhair cut. I look really fast right now, but I walked in,I looked at my hair stuff. She's no, I I was looking forgarbage. Came to throw it in and on my rides I didn't. Inever mind the masks because I'm such a nerve that I just kept thinking oflike, you know, I love like optimist prime, you know, becausehe's got that thing on. I just like, I feel like fine,but you know, after wrong cluster phobic. I found that out after one ofmy shoulder mrys. I'm clost her phobic. Imagine that. If getsyou black belt clouster phoby gin. Like when I get some my face,I start going on. Well, you know when you're breathing. I'm like, I gotta take this off so I don't go anywhere. I go home, to the gym, to the school and back home again. It's likethat's all I'm who've ever guessed who I mean? I climbed out of thembram machine. I told that woman. I said good, Ou here andI'm climbing out of and you think pulling...

...me out. I'm like what justhappened? Oh my gosh, I freaked out. I ran in the bathroomdo water on my face. She was yeah, we got ten minutes andyou're done. I laid back down. She tried to strap me in.Oh, I ripped it off. I said I'm out of here. I'msorry, don't walk right out the door. I'm like wow, yeah, yeah, you know when you get one of those panic attacks or whatever happens. So you really don't know until you're early are after you know you've doneit. It's real. Yeah, I mean it's my wife. My wifegets. My wife gets very uncomfortable in them, our machine, and shesaid it's not just it's not just the closed in part, it's the noises. kind of comfortable. There's kind of a I've never been in one,but they're supposed to be like there's this banging sound or something. Yes,it's like and she said it's very it was on top of being closed in, it was the noise and it was just so unnerving. She said ifshe had to been in there much longer, she would have done what you did. She were just she would have found a way out. Yeah,I look, there's a good woman said, am I going to fit in that? I did. I said I'm I going to fit in there,and she was, honey, up with a whole lot bigger people than youin there, and I'm like I had to look like how'm all fit inthere? It really doesn't like they're they you know, not all of themare made that way. I'm kind of shocked that they didn't like tell you, because there are some that have just there. They hang above you andit's completely open. Open, open them, or that's what I had did.Yeah, and I mean to me I think that's a lot, alot better, but I used to design an engineer medical equipment in years ago, and so I yeah, I don't Miss It. We did, likewe had this table that would lower. It was all the way down onthe ground so that you could sit on it, but then we were likewhen all they need to stand on it. So what it did it would raiseup and it would tilt at the ninety degree a goal and then youstep onto it and kind of step back and it would lower you down andthen would raise you up to where the overhead x ray machine would come in. And so we had that whole get up thing, that table. Everybodyloved it. They thought was a great innovative thing. This is like probablytwo thousand and but the trick of it was was the actuators, like wehad to go from hydraulic to electric because there was two of them in orderto carry that way, because you got to think like well, what ifyou got a four hundred pound person. Right, so these actually weirs hadto be rated for that. So it was always engineering math that goes intoit, which is really funny because I felt math in high school. Gofigure, and so we kind of got it, but then the actuators wouldgo at separate times where they would kind of lag behind each other's. Sothis table was really more like a shaking machine than it was a table,an amusement park road. Yeah, so I was like there's what an earthquakefeels like. And then, yeah, so I don't miss that at all. And trying to figure out the logistics of, you know, how todesign things and make things so that like open MRI had to come about becausepeople like you were like we got people like jumping through this thing like it'sa Hulu. We got to get it open one done. The Nice thingpeople like you is needed them. Yeah, anyways, totally not on topic ofcharacteristics of an entrepreneur, because that's what we're talking about today. ButJohn, I think you look something up that's rather interesting for the brand bitdid that. I think this is from one of our probably one of ourfavorite brands. It comes up pretty often Harley Davidson, like every other automanufacturer. They've launched a new line of electric bikes under a sub brand calledlive wire, and so it's kind of a you know, we talked aboutbrand extensions, brand evolutions, brand dilution. So there's a lot of a lotof things going on here, but kind of tie it into the topictoday. It's like, you know, as an entrepreneur and as a brand, you're you're always evolving. You've got to constantly innovate, you got totap into new markets develop new products, and so I thought it was ait was a good one that fit today, although you know, of course,nobody here is running a Harley Davidson type brand. But still the theprinciples apply, you know, when you when you release a new product likethis, obviously the ideas of revenue streams new markets but at the same time, more in line with what we talked about, gives your brand something totalk about, a reason to get pre a new area to kind of developcontent and social conversations around. So I thought it was a fitting topic today. Yeah, it's awesome comic billing, but it's time it's timely because ofthe soul. No, wait, sorry, who's right? It's Gott's got.Don't go ahead going, no, no, I just I just likeJohn for it was just particularly particularly timely because of the the the fuel disruptionthat we've had over the last week with the the hackers hacking fuel pipeline.You know, you know, the talk about electric vehicles just kind of timely. But you know, Harley makes an announcement and I think this is likethe second brand extension Harley's put out there,...

...because they have another one. Ithink it's called bule and it's less of a cruiser bike brand more ofa, pardon the expression, crotch rocket style. Yeah, I mean it'sall it's all around the urban you know, they're targeting more of the urban marketand younger demographic could who isn't super concerned or doesn't have a need forlong distance travel. And you know they are more concerned about energy, youknow whatever, shift to electric energy and all that stuff. So yeah,it's but the electric bike has to have the sound, like Harley spent likeand I think they even patent it, like the exhaust to have that sound. So the electric bike here's the sound. Nothing is the question that popped upto me. We've talked about brand dilution. Like when you think ofHarley, you think Roget tough. Yeah, they've tried for years to get thethe woman audience and they have been fairly effective at that, but it'sstill mainly, you know, masculine. You know, and I don't particularlycare, but I think, and you you know, you do introduce theelectric line into that and it does a dilute what Harley Davidson is kind ofthat. It's core. Yeah, I don't know, that's to be kindof to be determined. Well, I think to your point, and I'min pressed at Hardy's doing that because as an entrepreneur in a business owner,we remember places like sears gone. We remember places like toys are US gone. They failed to make adjustments right. They failed to make adjustments to whatthe trend of the industry is doing. Yeah, so even like myself rightnow, I'm I'm not really really big about putting myself out there on youtubeand all that stuff. I'm just not. I try to build my empire andgrow my school from within. But everybody's got that platform and Hardy DavisonElectric is coming. I mean it's coming. It's coming full steam. I'm likeyou. I want the rumble, I want the gas, I wantto spill the gas down the side of fender, I want to smell,you know, all those things that I'm used to. But yet everybody elsegrowing up like our kids, it's a different world. Now they're wanting tosave the plan and energy, all this different stuff. And you know,Elon Musk man, you got to tip your head to that cat. Heis just a genius in my opinion, and he is got it going fullsteam ahead with Harley doing that. You know, they know what their futurelies. They're not going to be sleeping, and that's as an entrepreneurs I'm sittinghere at my desk, I often wonder what's going to be the changingtide in the martial art business right because you've got so many things that youcan do. There's so many online services that you can offer, there's somany different things. You know, what's it going to be in twenty yearswhen we look at these phones? I mean, think about it, ourkids will, our grandkids will laugh at us that we carry this around.What's the next step? I don't know. There's going to be something so coolthat they're going to joke that you carry this block around would you carrythat around for and your like? And that is everything in it, youknow, so for hardy to do that from the brand perspective. Man,I hit my hat to him. You know, those guys will be herefor the long halt they if they continue to think like that, if thebattery technology, the battery technology, just keeps getting better and better, andthat that's really like one of the keys to it. I mean even withyour phone, you know, I mean the battery technology, and that isnot what it was when the iphone first came out in two thousand and seven, which is hard to believe it's only been ten years, or, sorry, little over ten years, right. So, but Elon and what he'sdoing, you know, and their batteries and how they're designed. It's kindof like a lego system, and how they put them together and of course, you know the wheels and the axles. There's no axe or wheels. Iactually turbines. So they're charging as it's going. So it's trying tofind that way to, you know, build smaller better and still provide that. It's like I keep thinking about you know, it's based on a book, but there's like this eighty year cycle where things happen and every generations liketwenty years. And so after after eighty years, big events happen and oursociety sort of gets a reset, like between the civil like, if yougo between the civil war and World War Two, it's about eighty years.You Go between the Revolutionary War and the civil war, it's about eighty years. So after World War II we're coming up on eighty years. And youknow, the but I would call the builder generation, is Wor War Twogeneration. You know, those those guys that they were there, like theones that were like they were on that high. You know, they savedthe world. I did it, I dave the world, just like aMario Game. And then, you know, you get like the boomers, youknow, and we seen all that. And then, yeah, my generation, generation x, which is where Elon must comes from. We're likenomads. What's Elon doing? Take building things to take us better and fasterfrom a to B. and so now you got the millennials and Gen zafter that. We don't really know what Jens's going to do, but youknow, the millennials are typically artists. You know, they're typically yeah,so it's like you see it. And...

...so now we're like in that finalphase after two thousand and eight, like when you started, you know,in your school and all that happened in the great recession. We're in thatfinal stretch. What the heck is going to happen between now and, Idon't know, two thousand and twenty eight, you know, our two thousand andtwenty five whatever. You know, we're kind of like in that timenow. So I don't know, I think that we'll see a lot.Yeah, the electric thing is not going to stop. I'm kind of curiouswhat's going to happen with like just electrical power to your house, because youknow, and I it may be the same price, it may not,but for tenzero dollars putting, you know, solar panels on your roof, andyou get into this COOPO cell an electricity, because obviously electricity is thisthing that you can't like hold onto. You have to do you have toomuch of it, you got to sell off it, right. And sohow? How, what point do we get where roofing on every house andevery neighborhood is generating electricity for the power grid? You know, it's justthat that's the thing that just I keep watching innovations and energy and it's yeah, the pipeline think kind of got everybody's attention because everybody's like, how doesone pipeline sadly shut down the entire east coast of the country? Because that'skind of sad true that that anyway. I don't know how that ties intoall that. That's another change, just like how we started out with Batman, which we'll get back into, but I'm sure. But so one ofthe one of the characteristics being an entrepreneur for me is like you got tohave a vision, but it doesn't mean you got an idea. You gotsomething that people can follow, because if you have an idea, there's one, there's a there's a saying and I don't know if I put it inthe notes, maybe it's in a different characteristic I put in, but it'sone of my favorite ones that I heard. It's a little snarky, but it'slike if you think you're a leader and you turn around and no oneis following you, you're just taking a walk. And so if heat it, so, if you've got a vision and nobody can figure out what inthe world you going to do, that's what you're doing. True so howdo Scott, how do you, when you think of vision? What?There's no wrong answer to this, but how did what comes to your mind? Well, here it's interesting you said that, because one of the reasonsI believe that I've been successful in my business here at Gracie Jutsu of Kentuckyis because I've sold my vision. I sell my vision to everybody that walksin. So if you, if you guys would come to the school andyou know, I get to I get to know people, I try totry to talk with them and gets noise. I was building my brand and buildingmy school because I didn't want poison in. I didn't want people like, let's just say, you, had a completely different vision on what youwanted. You came in, ran off, different students, did whatever. Iwanted to try to keep my vision in my brand all the same.And so what I did was is I knew who I wanted to market to. That's that's that's gentleman, from thirty on up to sixty. I knewthat when they came in training at our Academy at the number one thing issafety. You want to be able to come in, tryin and get agreat work out in. You want to feel safe, because a lot ofpeople come in here. Anything out, MMA, I'm going to be UFC, who's going to punch me in the face? Who's going to do this? I mean, everybody had and I'm like no, no, that's notwhat we do. And then I so I start, I start layering outto them how we approach training, how we are methodology, on teaching,our methodology, on how to develop your skill. So people come in,they go oh, okay, okay. So then I'm constantly explaining to themabout reaching out to more people. This is where the second location came in, and we've had people that have left us a year, year and ahalf ago, and they recommend people coming into way. People an oh,yeah, you remember so so used to train your yeah, like all hittheir OPEM toils. This is a place to go. We wanted to comehere and you know. So then they sign their family up or they signthemselves up. And so the vision, the vision, is so crucial,and I'm sharing this exactly what you had just said with one of my professor'shere. He's actually opening a church. He's from Chicago. His name isAdam Miller pro he's a pastor and his church's life church, and that's whatI share with him. I said, Adam, you've got to share yourvision every time. Someone will listen, because people want to follow when you'rewhen you're doing well, they want to follow you. Or if you've reallygot a cool vision, they want to follow you. They want to orat least hang out to see what you're going to do right, because yougot a really cool vision. Is I I want to it's going to kindof hang out to see if he can really pull this off. And thenwhen you do the like, Oh, man, I'm with you, dude, I'm where are you going? Man, I'm with you, and I've hadthem say that to me like man, I appreciate that. So then Istart visually looking at what they want. Then I say, Hey, John, I know that you're looking at doing a podcast. Like I havea great pocket. I want to keep the family together. I will helpyou at any point in time you want to branch off and do your ownpodcast or you want to get started doing something else. So I start layingthose roots out to these guys to make sure that I don't build my completeopposite, which is my competition, and they part down the street from youand they start trying to take your student because they're in here and they knoweverybody. So, you know, building...

...the brain and the vision. That'ssomething that I it's a constant, nonstop approach to talking to new customers comingin. This is how I teach your kids. Parents love when I sitthere and explain to them how we layer your kids out, like in inschool, four and five, four, five and six year olds, it'sspider monkey and me. You're with them. It's a bonding experience. Then wego to junior's are a minions, which is seven, eight nine,they go solow here's what we teach them juniors. We prepare them for college, which is the adults class. So this whole layer of walking and I'vehad kids with me since they were four years old and their two thousand,three hundred and fourteen. I've got kids in college right now that I've hadsince they were seven. There and during different states at college and and it'svery effective. So I one of the things I emphasize is always, always, share your vision to anyone that'll sit and listen to you, because theywant to follow you, that they really like what you're saying. Yeah,yeah, I think that that brings up something interesting, and that's it's gotthe you have the ablility to articulate your vision, because it did. It'sone thing to have a vision in your mind and understanding for yourself with thatvision, is we being able to articulate it and people in such a wayso that that it's alluring, that it's that's desirable, that it did it, it has those qualities that make people want to be a part of it, and I think part of that you're out. You're very sincere about whatyou do. You believe in your product, you believe in what you do,so you evangelize essentially of that message and that just has a natural kindof it has a contagious effect with people. So it's you need to have thevision, but you have to do what you do apparently so well thatyou have to be able to articulate your vision to people in a way thatis attractive and makes them want to become a part of it. Yeah,and that that's how, when you talked about leaders, if you walk andyou know there are people that I'll go through a burning building. True Story. There's people here in my school that I respect so much that if thebuilding was burning this we got to go this way. I would follow themright into the flame. You know, I believe in my heart that they'regoing to take me out of this and once you develop that set and peopleknow that you care about them. It's not about me. You know thatthis is a really weird statement, that it holds true and there's there's dumb, not Beust and at all. I don't really care about the money.I really don't it them. I mean, I don't want anything. I mean, I my house is almost paid off. I just put money backfor retirement. I mean, and I'm doing better than I've ever done inmy entire life. And I don't even care. I don't even care aboutthe money. The money's like it's all secondary, right. It's like whatever, I care about impacting lives and building this my empire, building this thingthat people want to be a part of and they want to come and say, Hey, man, this is so cool and I've never really felt thisand wow, man, you know, when I come here it's different.I mean, you can go on my google reviews and and read. Imean this is these are things people from out of town saying. I walk, I came from out of town. These people treating me like family.I mean I I just met him for the first time. He treating melike family. The guys are super cool, Great Jiu Jitsu and this is thekind of message you want to send down. So people all want tokind of come here and say, Hey, man, this is this is kindof cool. You know? Yeah, well, you don't. I wasa doing like and I'm just using you're building a legacy. You guysare building, you know, your brand that you're doing right now. Youmay have to talk to other people close to you. Maybe you don't havelike when you say customers, but I always like to, when I'm infront of a customer, let them know who we are, and I didthat in the automotive industry whenever we would come in and I was kind ofa consultant. I'm saying, Hey, listen, I understand your business.I can tell you probably what you're doing, just about the number of employees youhave here, by the number of cars you've got on the lot.I know what the average are O is. I mean so when you dive intosomething that deep, they look at your girl. Okay, well,this guy's' full of crap intands my business, but then you set about how youcan help them. Right. So this is what we're bringing to you. So guess what I want to do? I want to tune in, Iwant to listen to what you have to say, because everything that yousay is is resignated with me. You're hitting that spot towards like that's interesting. Wow, I never I didn't know that. I didn't know this.These guys are going to be big time at one point. You know,everybody, we start somewhere and then we just start to gravitate and go allthis, specially when we have the vision and then we have our brand clearlydefined, clearly defined and we know exactly where we want to go. Right. Yeah, the the tail in on that is like and we're kind ofdancing around it. But the next one is the for me that I puton there was discipline, having the discipline, because when you say that you wouldfollow the person through a fire because you trust that person as a leader. Quite often, you know, people hear that and go like that's crazy, I would never follow them through that. I would never do that because that'sjust going to lead me down to that path. It's that's when therubber beats the ROAP, you know, because it's really easy to say I'mdedicated, I'm disciplined to this, I'm...

...going to do this, but thenwhen it gets tough, do you are you really we know for marriages likethat, you you spend more time in the marriage on like when you takeyour vows, for better or for worse. Mostly it's for worse, Richard,for poor. Gonna be a lot of poor, sickness in and health. They a lot not much health. You know you're always going to endup dealing with that and that usually leaves, of course, elastic mark because youjust you remember that trauma. But you know a leader will take peoplethrough that. They show them that you know there's an end of the tunnel, there's a light coming. It's just keep there, stay with it.That's kind of what I was sort of going through with the disciple planning,but I wanted to put on there, like I don't know how you allfeel, but I've never really liked a hundred percent bought in to like ifyou're discipline in an entrepreneur, you got to get up at for am andgo to the gym and do all these things and and I'm like, Iwould be napping by zero am. I would just be done right. Yeah, well, I mean there's you know, I'm not not a huge fan ofthe hustle hustle culture, as they call it. I mean there's workinghard and then there's kind of working stupid. You know, there's there's a thinline. Honestly, it's easy to kind of get obsessive about what you'redoing and if you have that vision, it's addicting when you start to seeit come true and it's like you it's hard to know where to draw thatline on. You know, obviously your health, you know your personal relationships, but you know, I've also heard entrepreneurs say I followed my business andit cost me my relationships, and I'm okay with that. So it's kindof like it's a very personal, you know, it's a very personal,subjective thing, but at the same time, you know, I don't think wewant to advocate for working yourself to death, but at the same time, you know, we talked with you in the pre interview, Scott,about what it took for you to get where you're at today, and tome that's that's inspiring as an entrepreneur as somebody who's who's you know, Jasonand I and mits are trying to do the same thing. We're pushing throughthe tough time and trudging through the you know, a pandemic and kicking abusiness off the ground. But to me I thought your story was, youknow, the one you say. I think should share it here because Ithink it's something that people, especially right now, need to hear with theyear that they've had. Sure, yeah, I agreed. You know, Iwhen you were talking. I call it works more than one harder,and that's that's the philosophy that I lived by, even in the automotive industry, because a lot to your point, I believe wholeheartedly. You've got tohave a healthy relationship with your family, healthy relationship with your health, healthyfinancial relationship, meaning I work two jobs right to get mine off the ground. I was grinding somewhere else and coming here and hustling at night, andthank God I did, because I got to let go right. And thenspiritual, I mean I was missing that for a long time and so forme that was a missing link that helped me out of immensely. And youknow, I went through some family tragedy about a year ago, my brotherwant to take his own life, and it's like these things will pull you. You know, you're an entrepreneur, your running, run and run,running. Life still happens over here. Yeah, happening. You know,not everybody's on board with you. They're doing their thing. And and thenalso, when it happened, you got to stop and you got to turn. You got to deal with it right. But then this doesn't quit because stonesturning, it's going down the hill. So you got to chase it andgrab it and do whatever. But for me, when, you know, when I when I put forth that effort of trying to get to bean entrepreneur, tried up to try to become an entrepreneur, I failed,and I think I shared that with your earlier. This is how it allstarted for me. This is where, when I say my mind set,this is all worked for me. But my mindset happened when this happened andI took money out of my home, as we all do. I'm goingto take a second, second mortgage. I'm going to bad business. Iwent online, I found the business. It was a tanning salon. Mywife was glowing. She's going to be a salon owner. We go inand every single ounce of everything that happened there was wrong. My Gut toldme, and I'm sitting there going this is not good, this is notgood, this is not good. All right, I'll take it, andit's like what did I do right? So I could go down the entireline of everything I screwed up on, from the lease all the way togetting out and selling the business. Right. So I go there and we didnot make one time for two and a half years and we work twelveto sixteen hour days. Now, when I'm saying that, I'm taking myson, passing him off to my wife, as I'm working a full time job, going into to relieve her seven days a week. Wound up.You know, we turn around. I finally said, you know, weI went to a friend. He looked at the Pano. We're going toend it. So I was twenty five, thirty five thousand dollars deep in it. Sold as much as I could.

I still owe debt and the leasingcompany said now the person you sold it to, you signed the lease, so you're we're holding you accountable for another two and a half years.So while I was accountable for another two and a half years for her business. So I'm stressed. You know that, because once she, if she defaultedout, had to pay the pay every month. You know, theythey would have wanted their money. So when I started my school, myson need to go to college. I didn't have any money, I hadchild support, I had all this stuff going on. I said, AH, I'LL START A club. I took three hundred eighty five dollars. Ibought yard signs, prepaid phone and one months ron at a church. Igot thirteen people. Took that money. Hey, whatever, I needed topay more advertising, got more people, had an opportunity. moved to anotherbuilding. I did wound up getting more people. Wound up taking that buildingover. Then we got up to like seventy something people. And right atthe heat of the recession, I noticed people were drap driving from louivill outand it was getting less than people were leaving. I said we're going togo under US and I'm going to have to make a change. So Isaid Let's look in Louisville and it was amazing. Everybody called you back.You looked at a building there blowing your phone. I'm like wow, Imean I can call right now. I could go around and probably they wouldn'tcall me for maybe a week. They were calling you within the hour.Hey, here's what I got, here's what I'll do for it. I'mlike, this is crazy. Why I didn't find anything. Finally I foundtwenty five hundred square feet. We walked in and we took it. Now, keep in mind when I did this I had all the money that Imade in Spencer County. I just put it in a savings account. Inever spent the time because I had a job. I'm hustling. I putall the money in the bank, walked in, I paid all the buildout, paid all the build out at all the match did every payd catchboom. So Dave Ramsey, one hundred and one. Everything was paid offright. So I start. We go to about a hundred hundred and twenty. Thirty students were STARTINE's in there. I mean it's literally startine drew walkingdown the hallway and you're having to turn sideways people, you know, goingin and out. And the next door became available mid lease. We werein our third year. It became available four thousand square feet and my landlordsaid, Hey, I'll do the build out, which I didn't understand why, but he was selling the building. It's easier for him to get ridof the four thousand square feet and rent the two hundred, which I didn'tcare. He coming it. died the build out and I'm like go.So I'm thinking I'm going to put a curtain down the center and two classes. Well, the first month I've got parents going, you need a biggerboat. Kids are from one of the other and I'm like, oh mygosh, what am I dude? I mean kids were just rolling through thedoor. Adults we you know, we'd have forty fifty on the mat andso we were very, very blessed and everything that we purchased and we've gota very nice facility. Everything that we purchased bought, did paid cashual justjust paid it off, paid it off, paid it off, paid it off, paid it all all while I work for a company that I workedfor a family for twenty eight years. I was in that industry thirty twoyears and they literally called me in. I did not even see it coming. They called me in and they let me go because a bigger company aboutour smaller company. So they trimmed out mental management so when I talk aboutcoming to Jesus. It was like, Oh man, what am I goingto do? And you were talking about the grind and I know you've madea comment about, you know, not liking the hustle. When your backsagainst the wall, that's different. So I had I had a noncompete clausethat I signed and I contacted my attorney. He was I yeah, because wecan win that. It was going to cost Fifteenzero. You got it, and I said, Antony, I don't think I want to pay fifteengrand. I don't know if I'm going to stay this industry. He's that, call me if you need me, man, fifteen grand will get youout of it. I'm like, so I looked at my wife, youknow, and it's good to have a partner, but I looked at mywife and she said we can do this. Says we can do this. SoI look over, because I just talked to a gentleman the other day. I have a pillow sitting on my rick and I slept on those couchesout there. I can't tell you how many times I get up at eightin the morning traveling, do private lesson, teach noon classes, go grab abite to eat, come back to the couch, grab the pillow,go to sleep. My wife would wake me up in an hour. Iget back up, get dressed again and all the kids would just start floodingschool at five o'clock and I would teach all the way and get home atthirty at night, driving through my subdivision, look at all my neighbors watching TVas I'm driving in, going up, get back inside the house, eatdinner, crash, get back up, back at the School d eight o'clock, doing private lessons again. Then I would do noon class, thenI would eat and I would sleep on a couch and then I would getup that evening until I started getting my staff developed and then all my guysstarted picking up classes where I was off on a Tuesday, off on aThursday. So I had that. I had the vision. The thing thatI can share master Clarks that this year's ago he said when everybody was worriedabout getting the next student, he was I was worried about getting my nextinstructor. So I have this vision of where I see this company going atthe end. I do, and there's...

...always that saying have the end inmind, and that is so true. From the name to what you're doing. Have the end in mind. How are you going to sell it?And I mean I'll pose that question to you guys. Have you set backand said, when this hits it, are we ever going to be ableto sell or we've got to shut it down? Right? So those kindof questions are things you look at and everything that you do will align withwhere you're going, because if it's just opensee, I mean we're just drivingthe boat right and we're doing good. We're we've got some waves, wegot some sun, but where are we going? I don't know. Let'sjust keep going. Man, this is awesome. So then you'll come apoint. I'll be fifty five this year. I'm not a spring chicken. Mywife will be sixty in July. So we're not spring chickens. Sowhat am I going to do at the end? Right? So now I'min the midst of determining. Okay, I'm getting all these schools going.What am I going to do when I'm tired? Right, Jujitsu's pretty demanding, and I mean I get tired and my body, I've had a youknow, I just get tired. So I'm like, okay, I'm notgoing to be able to do this for extended period of time. So I'malready looking off at other businesses, other things, because I'm a grower.I've got to constantly, constantly grow. So going back to the school.Now I make a living teaching Jiu Jitsu and it's been very, very rewarding. I've been all over the world. I taught in Japan. I didn'tI went to Sassabu, Japan, taught a seminars at the naval base.I've been to Brazil. went to Brazil and trained in Brazil. So thisis what you Jutsu is given me. I'll never be able to give itback. And now it's giving me a living and I'm so thankful for thatand that's that's just not lip service. I you know, a lot ofpeople say that. I am genuinely thankful for what it's given me in mylifetime. In the friends, it's amazing. I got some I got I gotsurgeons, I got attorneys. They all race to the school just totrain because they want to get away from their world. They just want toget away from it and Jiu Jitsu is where they come to. Need myhour and a half and then I'm out and I'm like this is so freakingcool, right. I'm not at a place like I use the analogy.I don't. I never want to be a service director at a dealership.You Bout seventy thousand part is a problem with it. I'm pissed off right. I'm coming to be going huge, seventy grand and this is going onwith it and I'm like, I don't nobody does that here. They walkin and awe, only told him Anam doing that meeting. Man, Ihad Jujutsu, I got to go and I'm it. Well, I meanit's kind of like what we the ground that we've covered. I mean,you know, talking about and the characteristics of an entrepreneur, beginning with visionand knowing and discipline. I mean you're hitting into passion. I mean youkept being passionate about what you're doing because you could just kind of part ofyour makeup. But you're you're not. I've met some passionate entrepreneurs to thepoint where I'm like, Oh, Whoa, okay, telling it down. Stopyelling at me. You know what I mean? I mean sometimes weget that way and it takes either by age or through practicing certain disciplines andeverything and just learning to kind of cool off. Don't get too hot,they'll be too cold, but don't overwhelm people with it. And so Iremember my story. Early on I was just way too passionate for people tobe able to handle it. And that was in my early S, ofwhich John is in now. But John is completely a hundred eighty degrees fromwhat I was like when I was in my s. and then you talkedabout, and I'm going to bring this up because he talked you. Youhit on it like, like what does nerd brand do? And like,you know, thirty years or whatever, we hit where we're at. Andyou know, our diversity of our age group is pretty crazy. You know, Mitch, I won't say your age, but it's it's quite closer to Scottand John. Yeah, say that. And then you know John's and itsJohn's thirty. I'm forty five. So you know, I look atlike for nerve brand. You know some point John's going to be sitting whereI am, because I am be here, like I'll be maybe like chairman ofthe board or something. If he needs me, to call me,but you know, at some point it's his ship. That he's driving andhopefully there's another person that's where with him to, you know, continue thaton. So and nerd brands kind of set up that way. I meanthat's that's the way we are. Like we can, we can have secessionplans and just keep rolling that way. But typically in our business, Imean there's an absorption or something happens, you know, at some point itjust is inevitable. It's just how you prepare for it, like you say, and there's you have to do that. But we're passionate about it, whatwe do enough that that's why we think of it that way. Wethink about the future. Probably a little bit too much knowledge. Did youguys have whether someone's S it's like, you know, one of the thingsthat I share with so many upcomers as mentors. I mean, you know, I've got I've got so many mentors...

...that I meet with, I physicallymeet with. I have one. He's a dear friend of my, thankgoodness. It's Kelly construction. I may have shared that with y'all. It'sa multi, multi multimillion dollar construction company and one of the owners I playedsoftball with both of the one of the owners was in a bobcat pouring myconcrete back when they were nothing and now they have offices. You know,it's amazing and he gives me such a sense of piece and clarity. NowI also have another gentleman that owns eight schools that's in Arizona that I zoomare actually messenger call with him every once a month for one hour and wediscuss different topics and things because he's specific to my industry, right. Andthen I have what I call my spiritual advisor, which is Adam Miller,who's out there now. I'm we have a similar this weekend and any timeI need to sit out with him, will go meet up and we'll sitand we'll talk about things that's going on in your head. Feeling right,feeling wrong, because when you guys start becoming successful, and I do believeyou will, meaning like hitting it where you want, jealousy comes in fromeverybody. People will start saying things and you'll go, why is he sayingthat? Because they're jealousy. They don't have what you have. So youhave to understand when the naysayers are coming in. They're not. You gotto no one to say. Now be careful what that person saying, they'renot saying it for your benefit, they're saying it for their benefit. Yeah, then tours becomes so crucial in the sense of saying, instead of goingdown this thicket, right, you're able to talk with someone and they theyredirect you just by them sharing a story or whatever, because my mentors nevertell me what to do. They just say, Hey, here's what I'vedone, Hey, let me tell you a story about somebody I know.And then so they just give me information and I get to lay it allout and I go, okay, well, this doesn't make sense, this makesmore sense to me, and then I'll wind up decision and going thatroute. Yeah, some towards our friends. I mean that's it's really what itis. I mean a mentor as a friend, they may be likesomebody that and will the other. The fourthing about an entrepreneur decisionmaking skills.Not all of us are good at that. Not Every entrepreneur is good at that, and that's why it's good that you brought up mentors, because yougot to find somebody that is at they at least can help help walk youthrough the decisions that come your way, because they're not everybody's a wise sageand in fact no one really in this in my opinion, is no onecan be that person and have all the bases covered. You have to havesome outside help, some outside advice from a mentor and, you know,and faith. You know you have somebody that's you know is discipling you,as you could say, if you want to use a church term. Butit's still the same principle that you have somebody that's sort of been there,and it's perfect example what you just said. They're telling you a story and thattelling you what to do. They're just kind of like saying, likethis is what happened to me, and you know, they are riding onthat. Like I hope you're Spartan enough to figure out that the stove ishot. I promise you it's hot, even though you still probably want totouch it. I'm telling you a story about the time I got burnt andI hope to God you figure out don't do that. You know, insome people listen well and some people don't, and you know, some people alllearn by getting burnt and yeah, easy. You know, my kidsthink there's I think that's kind of the testaments to having a cofounder, tobring it in a business partner. You know, I mean I can onlyspeak from personal experience, you know, running an agency on my own forabout two years before Jason and I got reconnected and decided to go through amerger and, you know, expand nerd brand. You know I'm not aquick decision maker. I'm an analytical, thinking the micro details kind of guy, which is necessary. And Yeah, and bringing Jason to the table,you know, it added that extra layer and that evolution of, you know, we've gotta this is how we're going to scale, this is we're goingto hire this person, we're going to do this, we're going to dothat, and and let me kind of play in the execution of what happenswith that person afterwards and all that. So I think there's a lot ofwhen you look at these characteristics, and especially the decisionmaking one, you knowthere's a lot of power and obviously give up equity, you give up wealthprobably when you bring in a partner, a cofounder, but you got tolook at what you're getting and what that's going to do to kind of,you know, scale whatever it is you're doing and to have a mentor too. Have somebody bounced stuff off of internally, who really gets the business? Idon't think you can overstake the value of having kind of a cofounder,of partner and, at worst, a mentor who's outside the business kind ofhelping you just make decisions. As other way. They got a good senseof humor because, you know, Fart jokes are always fun me. Idon't care how old you are. A fart joke a really good one.It's hilarious and a part I mean you can do the most untimely thing inthe world, it's hilarious. Nothing change,...

Hass, nothing's changed this grade school. I'm like, this is just awesome plate. Sir. I hada be an entrepreneur. Yeah, I had. I had a met Ihad a mentor that I met with when I was going through school, andI'm going to I was one of those adult learners. I graduated in twothousand and ten, Yada, Yada, whatever. But I met with himat a McDonald's on record and lane every morning and man, he was agreat guy. But he's a PhD now. His background was New Testament theology,so he had a Bible that was like English and the other half wasthe Greek. So, being a PhD, being a scoctual scholar, I shutup and I listened a lot, but I was just amazed at howhe would joke and share and the things he would say, because you wouldjust sit there and go like but your head of the mission board Shelby County, like what, what did you just say it? Because he would justkind of come in with these little quips just to kind of break up thethe seriousness because and I find that to be a good a good thing ina way, to you know, when you have a conversation, it's gota lot of levity to it. You know, try to find, tryto remember to be a little keep that humor because, and I mean atthe end of the day, you're going to go home to hopefully a family, to people that love you. So you don't want to go home inthat mindset of always just being on and part of that that will affect yourdecision making skills. If you're always on and you never step away, ifyou just never take a break back or break away from that tunnel, youreally can't see the big picture, you really can't see everything that's going onaround you. And you know, mentors and other people. They're really goodat that. It's really good at help. You like, okay, well,hold on, they look around. I agree. The perspective. Yeah, it's all a perspective. It's all off and I mean that's a that'sthe value of having somebody either like with nerd brand you and you and Jonathan, or somebody can kind of come in from the outside, that's ceasing,from a completely different perspective. They can see things in a way that youcan't because you're in. I mean in Scott's case he's got outside mentors becausethey live outside his bubble. When you're insane. It's the same thing conversationwe have with clients, the value we bring to the table as we helpthem see from the outside of the bubble. Well, that's what a mentor does. Your you're dealing with the Daytoday, getting the work done, the internalissues, the internal problem, with the internal tasks. You need somebodycan stand outside and see the whole ball of wax, because you can't andsay well, your have you considered this or if you thought about this,because that's not on the that's not top of mind for you. Keeping thegears turning is top of mine. For you right. Yeah, we've gotwe've got a couple that are like that and they're they're, like you said, earliers, got their backs against the wall. So we kind of understand. But Eve, when your backs against the wall, like your back isgoing to stay against the wall if you don't find a way to kind ofget perspective, because it really is something that, you know, it's ahorrible place to be in. We know that. John and I have talkedabout like how we don't want to get there, you know. You know, we don't want to do like websites for the price you see on upwork, because there's no money in that and and the client isn't properly served.You know that for that brief moment they're going to be happy that they gotsomething, but then they'll realize the phone still ain't ringing, nobody's talking tome and nobody still knows who I am, and it's horrible. It's a horriblefeeling and we really like helping people fight get out of that. Soit's really hard to kind of get people out of the corner, you know, because we are telling them like you may have to sacrifice something, hopefullynot your firstborn. But something is how much you love that first born.Yeah, you like you know what. That first kid we were all worriedabout and falling down steps. By the second one we were like, I'vegot I've got a family that's got ten kids and I'm sure he go.Well, let me see, are not the person, but I'll give youthe third one. You can have him. Grief. That's spars and multitudes.They're there as family of ten kids, all from her and not emerged family. Ten kids. Wow, wow, like you wow, and they areawesome. And I mean she got a set of twins. Just just, they are just it's a well old machine. They just they cruise inlike a cruising like the gracis in the first UFC man. They all gottheir beanies on the outcome. Are they like like? Are they like IrishCatholic? Or the actually owns and Nott company in Middletown? I don't knowthe name of it, but you know, I'm like, well, man,you probably need to take a second, third more. He's just to feedthat crew, you know right, wow, they were going to bust. Yeah, it's possibly. They do. They all. And we have anotherfamily that's got six and another family. It's got seven and I'm envious.I think it's just awesome, I really do. I think it's awesomethat kids come in and are they have...

...a lot of kids like we.My wife has a son, I have a daughter and we have my son, Dalton, and he does Jiujitsu. He's the only one that really isinvolved in it. So we're kind of a split family right, and it'slike, you know, and I came from a family at for right andmom and dad and everybody came to our house. We it was like gameon all the time and it was like there was something going on in ourhouse nonstop. Seven kids running in and out and I just I just lovedit and I'm like this is just awesome. So what I did when my sonsI let all his buddies come over. So I raised like sport to sixkids pretty much every day of the week. It was it was itwas good. It was good and we it was it was awesome. Theyend one of the kids come he's getting married. He's getting married Saturday.Walks in, he just looks at the House and he says this is whereI grew up. He works at Ford Mary Getting Ready to move to afarm and Don's like, well, I'm sorry, we're selling, we're leavingthis place. You know. So, yeah, I told I totally getit. I told me. Yeah, I grew up as an only childand a friend of mine that I've known for years, John, met himrecently this week and he's got about six or seven. I've lost count.I don't even know if he knows how many he's got right now. Imean after a while he's like, oh, that's one of mine. Okay,walk into a store, you below flit up. They can't track usall. Well, Scott, we appreciate having you on the show. Ma'amnot, you're phone starting to blow up, so I think I can tell it. You probably get ready. have to go are in a bit,but we really appreciate you bad you guys have been awesome and I wish youguys nothing but the best. This has been an awesome conversation. If y'allget bored, hit me up. We can just have a conversation. Thiswas fun. Yeah, for the show. Tell people like like what you wouldlike. Where they can they find you. We have address social media, like where do you want to miss your time to plug something before wego? Yeah, we're in Jaytown at six one blank and Baker. AccessGracie. You just to Kentucky. There's another one that's named Sim Rabbit arsis Kentucky in Jaytown and we're also located in show Beville. You can findus at Gracie Kentuckycom and you can find us at Gracie Jiu Jitsu of Kentuckyon Facebook and Gracie Kentucky on IG's instagram. It's pretty much the media stuff thatI that I deal with. So and you can. We always weanswer the phone. We're always prompto. I mean if you leave a message, we get back. We're very, very prompto with that kind of stuff. So you know, this is what we do. You know, we'dlove to have you guys out. If you guys are ever board want tocheck you Jutsu, please by all means come out to Gracie Jujitsu Kentucky.We'd love to have you. Yeah, if I walk into your school,you'll know what you'll be like that fat guy over there. Now it's goingto get people. We don't have big enough else for you. Go justhead back out and go back to the TACO Bell. You can't exactly.Sorry. You look for sub for yeah, you need to go to subways.Then come back and we'll see. Go easy on yourself, you guys. Maybe we're awesome. Yeah, all right, you take care. Andeverybody out there. Yes, look him up, go visit this stuff.CHECK US OUT AT NERD brand agency. Everywhere on the social media. Goto Youtube, like subscribe on this video. Check out the PODCAST. Subscribe toit at Nerd brand agencycomls podcast. And everybody remember out there, keepyour nerd brand strong.

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